The Clever Dummies Podcast
The Clever Dummies Podcast

Episode 25 · 5 months ago

The CDP // Ep25: The Step ft. Haylie Tran

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this Episode of the Clever Dummies Podcast, we talk a bit about everything business, the steps we take in life, the interesting turns and twist we come across.

Sit back and join this beautiful conversation about life with Haylie.

thecleverdummiespodcast.com 

All right welcome everyone. Thank youfor joining us for episode. Number twenty five of the clever dummiespodcast, as always enjoyed by a nike. How are you going today, brother, i'mgood, my man, i'm good, it's good to be here doing this podcast. As always, youknow, there's been a couple of hiccups her in there a last episode absolutelywent to ship, so technical errors were to the max, but no nonetheless, my uitylike, if you would ask anyone in the industry. If anything like that happens,we shouldn't talk about it, but i feel like we need to. We spent nearly twohours on like relent balls deep on one of one of our best ever podcast and the current platform, were you know,hosting on called san caste? Did us thirty, but hey water under the bridge,but my it's just like at the gym by this reps, we're just doing reps we'rebuilding up we're getting stronger, so it is what it is. It might actuallygive us a good chance to do a part, to wit that episode so hey. What can youdo baby, but we seem to be. We seem to be so all good so far about fortyseconds in we're all right, matt so we'll see. If i gay also awesome, has everything been? Whatw yease good might everything's been great working super busy at the gymsuper busy at the golf course, obviously juggling two jobs, but youknow bigger than that is the commitment of marriage and, more so, thecommitment of a little baby girl. Obviously the abbe just turned elevenmonths. So you know i've said this multiple times before people are weirdfor celebrating month, adversis of kids. But when you have a kid you realize howrigged special that is so you're almost spirit. You know you celebrate ifer daybut yeah eleven months. She loves her her daddy now, which is good and thenyes, so she nearly your old he's so close to walking she's so close totalking so more of that to come, but my life's been very busy, but very goodbro, so yeah no complaints over here man- absolutely that's awesome, wonderful tohear! Well with today we got a guest, a friend. What about you, like you,you've, been upset with, like in any government authorities at the moment orwhat's got a well, it's been good. You know i had. Ithink that i spoke about this last episode, but i kind of we skip that soi'll speak about that again i went through a little bit of a you know:self imposed downward spiral because i moved back to sydney- and i was justyou know almost just creating my own resistance and like kind of fighting,you know just my situation of like i hate everything, so i got out of that,so which is a lot of fun and soon, as i go out o that e everything felt awesome like a great, iwas jus like all rot. He life is pretty incredible and yeah, but from you know, by from thatyou know, my new job is started to pick up. It's actually a lot of fun. You know it's a it's actually at fun atfirst i was like i don't know if i like this, but now it's actually a lot offun, and on top of that you know my company's your media is doing fairlywell with getting new projects and kind of you know when you fall into therhythm of managing all more teip like when you fall into the rhythm ofmanaging multiple things. It feels awesome. So you know it's kind of good.I mean, apart from my car, getting rare ended three times in the past threemonths. I think everything is great and phenomenal. It's not much as that'sright man. You can't win em all way, but anyway, that's another another day.Another episodes we always say: we've got a very special guest today mate,i'm going to leave the introduction for you today, but yeah. Take it away, awesome well, hell hilly, hilly, haley,say hello, wist of all i've known hilly from melbourne. I would say i probablytwo and a half years i v i mean. Obviously we haven't seen eachother for two and a half years, but yeah. I think we know each other twoand a half years. We met all common grounds of fixing problems, somethingyou know most of the time her. We created the problems that i was fixing,but that's beside that on talk about that eh. You know i tecollas to workwith, so you know, and then she recently started a business got marriedand i saw she's doing a whole bunch of steps out once i was like you know whatwe have to talk to talk to helly on the podcast, because you know one thing: welove it. The clavius podcast is taking a whole bunch of steps at once. Youknow so hello. I thank you so much for having me. I appreciate theintroduction a it's good to have a civilized voiceon the podcast i'll. Tell you that much but normal started it's right! Well,pell peep behind the curtain as he will, but no absolutely pleasure. Thank youso much for joining us. You can be totally honestly how many episodes haveyou listened to. So i listen to zero, but that's okay! Well that exactly hopefully you know it's justlike any great conspiracy theory. Hopefully you go down the rabbit holeafter this one, so i think i will yeahs...

...here we go. The key here is this iswhat i always say on the podcast. We've had more guests on the podcast thanactual listeners, okay ye, but it's generating all this yeah. Well, that'sright, like le m, pull up the sportif numbers and we'll figure it out, butanyway it is what it is. I t i n. Okay, let's give a little bit of basra tolisteners, and i mean even more so for me like how did you guys meet? Where doyou lois meet and is there like a funny story to that? Or this i mean i guess,every day where we were when we hung a gas to each other. So i worked at thelx theater together back and i was working in melbourne at the alextheater haley actually didn't work for the alexr. They worked for this tickingcompany that was contracted into the alex era, make a bigamia giant. I mean,i probably not shouldn't say the name because they're probably swiss itsticktack s g a superstar over there. Aren't they. So you know the good thing about tickettack. Is you know, i'm sure they won't? They won't mind me saying this: youknow they suck they genuinely do they can't organize anything with ship. Theyticketing to system is up har and just overall they just you know no good atanything honestly, you know they were running a antigone ticking system, so wow, i'm really going at him anyway. Sohale worked for them and she was kind of the person like a accounts managerfor alex peter, and you know she would come in, would always be. You know.They'll they'll always be something going on. Wild have five hundred peoplelining up and you know it'll be hilly at the box office trying to manage that while, while you know the peters aren'tactually working because we had the seating completely wrong, so i'm there,like i'm doing the whole seats and you, the best part, was to alcohol on wasyou know, haley would just look at the customer and just smile like yeahthey'd, be like you and she just smile at the mos like i don't know how you doit. So i'm glad to remember that about me. That's nice and i always used to joke around to oneof my friends tarente and i was just like she's like the c of positivity.Like really that's beautiful, that's so nice! Thank you were incredible. I mean it wasn'treally until you know there was this one time we had amassive shown, and you know there was people lining up and hel was no whereto be seen. I was like ousias like e manager there, so you know everythingand then, when i say, went manager really yeah. What i mean is. I was alsorunning the lights, as in pouring drinks, basically doing everything thatwas kind of the bibot place yeah. So i think we had we built a or- or you know, commonsuffering. I think that's so good. Probably so i think there was one timethat i came, and it was probably that day that i wasn't there on time. Justhad too many things on my mind and completely forgot that where i wasmeant to be on a on the day and a newish at the the computer like doingthe ticketing system- and i was like oh wait, why did need me here, but you're, jane, great ding down thephone the day o the say i was so impress is like how the hell do. I evenknow this. I'm sorry look t at the end of the day an equal sacrifice, customerexperience for it the only day of the week, so it is what it is. I look that was great all right so, like we got to unpackthat a little bit so i mean face can be specific because you know we are we.You know we are where you are a free lance podcast like we're about to betalking in terms of logistics and like when did you guys first meet and, likeyou know, there was a few fair few experiences that it sound like. I wasexplained there, but what was maybe what was your first memory or like ifyou go back the first time that you know you think about a neck? Doesanything come to mind? T shaky, think i remember meeting parentsinitially, that's a big cool to the customersthing and then i don't remember, i think atake showed up, and i yourself and i'm sure there was afew jokes in there one or two and they wouldn't get it up yeah. It was great, of course, those jokes in that thatultime, which is what sad, actually that's, that's ate, i kind of don t. Ithink it was more like just a gradual. I think you would have come a wild haveseen you on a shift where you were covering for someone and theneventually kind of just like you know, broking their most of the time a yeah. I i i'm pretty sure my me one ofmy one of your memories that i have is so asasking hey did you want to choketalk, because i don't want ol and i...

...rely a right yeah. You said no westdecision, i should have said yes, but i suggested those chocolate go. I shouldhave yeah and time frame. What are we thinking about like three years ago,two years ago, yehol years? So obviously you know fastforward. Maybe six months from that stage may be a little bit further. Weget to march in two thousand and twenty and of course you're in melbourne.Currently at the moment, we both and nick- and i are in new, so well he's insydney i'm in the mid north coast, but what is sort of the last period of time?What i don't know fifteen months been like for you usially in your industryas well sure yeah. So it's been, i mean i i feel like everyone has heard whatit's been like in melbourne, and i do we haven't been in melbourne, it's hardto describe it. Obviously, we've just we're just slowly coming out of anotherlock down now about fifteen months later and that's been quite tricky andexhausting and tiring, and all the words that you could think of. Yet it's been intense, especially inthe events industry. Obviously it's based on people gathering togetherand being together and on a small space yeah. So it's been tricky. So i wasworking at tickee during that time and my hours are quite significantlyreduced, which is completely understandable, give them the timeframe and everything that was happening at the time and then i had a shortstint in real estate, because i thought you know my hours are getting cut. Ineed a job. I need to support myself and i was also planning a wedding atthe time, so i was like. Oh, i really need to be doing something and i like to be busy. I don't like to sortof sit there and not have much to do so. It was tricky you know being stuck athome. We were living in a one bedroom apartment at the time. It was all kindsof horrible yea at the qualification that you gotduring ovid, or was that something you had sitting sort of in the back pocket,the old, the old? Yes, it yeah. So it was sort of something that i thoughtyou know what my cousin worked in real estate and i was so her about it. She'sstill working the old cousin. That's right as like you've got something idon't so i decided i'm going to go, get my certificate and real estate. I didthat smash it out as quickly as possible, and i had the time to do it so yeah. I did that and startedsearching for jobs and yeah. It was lucky enough to get one in the leasingsort of world so yeah. That was something definitely that i'd neversort of seen myself doing before. But i was quite a cool opportunity to getduring carved and you know, with the world being locked down actually beingable to go and open houses and be out, and about was quite nice rather thansitting at home. Not doing a good anything, also that's beautiful! Whenare we talking, because i know for a long period of time, particularly when you're en leasingyour showing people houses, your finalize people's rents, backgroundchecks. That sort of thing when was was, did the rental market take a dive aswell? I did that pick up as people were able to like, i guess, where you involved withthe virtual world of show casing houses as well sure, so i started in realestate, just as things were slowly starting to open up again, so we didhave perhaps on how many people we could have coming into different houses,which is quite challenging to manage. In terms of you know, x, amount ofpeople are super interested in a property, but you can only have threepeople walking through, so that was tricky to manage, but also createdquite a demand for houses, because not many people could go through so it wasslow at times, but it was busy at the same time. It's a really weird thing todescribe. It was a bit it's different like it. There were wasn't as muchhyper and it because you've only got three people going through properties,but also that demand was quite high for them as well, but i ll enjoyed it. Itwas like supply demand, you're, spreading the demand out if thesupplies brings spread out but so's the demand as well. So it's just like aslower pace, but that's it. That's really interesting. You're still doingthat now! No! So now, i'm actually so i finished up in january or december. Ithink it was. I finished up in december and started my role in january now,working at the na of a theater which is a theater on colin street here inmelvine, so back in the event space back into what i was similar to what iwas doing before so working with clients and ticketing and events. Soit's good. It's obviously has its challenges with ovid, but it's what ilove to do so yeah, that's! What i was going to say is what you love to do. Itfeels more like home right exactly it does it does. It feels like secondnature, which is fantastic, get to do what a neck was doing, work in thevenue side of things. So my inspiration he's our inspiration diste, how? Howare you finding working on the venue side of things compared to workingoutside of the venue? So i i'm finding it really good, i'm findingit different, obviously, because you're...

...sort of managing things from event, ifso, for example, when i was working just in ticketing for a ticketingcompany, was managing a lot of different clients at once for differentvenues, whereas this is sort of being specialized more in the venue andunderstanding like the lighting and the sounding the production side of thingswhich i'm quite interested in, even though i didn't think i was going tofeel like. Oh that's, really cool how that works and sort of the front ofhouse and just seeing how things work from a any perspective. I think, ifyou've not worked in a then you might not understand exactly how it works,which is really cool to see. There's a lot of things that i was like. Oh, ofcourse, you've got to think about. You know this element and that element, so that's been really fun to learn, andalso just, i suppose, having an expertise in understanding exactly whatthe venue has to offer and that sort of thing and working with clients in thatway is quite fun like i'm, enjoying that and lots of different people withlots of different ideas for shows and that sort of thing has been really fun.I think so. Yeah, it's been good. So far, it's only been about five or sixmonths, but i'm enjoying it so far. So it's beautiful it's just like any role,really the more you can take on, or at least have an understanding ofpeople's responsibilities and how the greatest game of things works. The moreyou can excel at your own role and i guess potentially further facilitategrowth in that industry as well, and you you almost came like just likeanything, the more you put more effort you put in the holic, the more you careabout it as well, and even though your more right still may be limited to whatyou're specializing in as you gone and you become empathetic like i always hadmanagers partic. I worked in bars after high school night clubs. That sort ofthing i was like these managers are freaking dicks. Like i hate my manager,then i started to understand what the hell they're going through and i'm like.Oh man, if i hadn't known that back, then i would have been a lot less of adick myself as well. So i experience i guess, but anyway it isnot what it is. That's right! That's right! So i mean you mentioned beforethat you got married. Is that true? I did. It is true. You have not been tothe rumors are correct. When did you get married, the rivers, a craft? I gotmarried in march, which i hear somebody else got married in i. What was the day?What was the baaters an even number? He i got m on the twal, which is very goodso yeah, it's good good, peroti like in a week. Where did you get married? Wegot married at a place, called avalon castle and copy two or castle yeahcastle for it yeah, but they were actually genuinelylovely. We had to change our date, one or two times yeah most tilouat wasgreat. Everyone tells you, it goes superquickly. It went super quickly. It was awesome, it was a lovely day, but itjust go so quick yeast same experience. It was so similar the whole time.Wasn't it like you, i was you're enjoying it the whole time and it'sjust like anything you're enjoying it. So it does fly. That's like man. I wishi had more time to take that in it was the last eighteen months i've beenstressing my bloody hair out and losing frigging air and what it how manypeople did you have. We had, i think, fifty five people- a nice e about fiftyas good, no, not too stressful like perfect and not to make it a party, butnot enough that you're worrying about too many crazy akin. Exactly that's not worrying about the wild cards. Youknow. Ah, you can keep them to a little at so good, that's so good! No, it was.It was great and we had did have a little bit of a panic there, because wehad the five day short circuit lock down in my yeah. That's right! That'sright! Yeah! We sure of what was going to happen. We had family and friendsand key people that we needed to get here from queensland. We weren't sureif that was going to happen, but thankfully effari so that's good,because i think that was the main thing that i that's a bit selfish, but themain thing i was worried about with the lock gars. I was like my wedding yeah,a hundred percent, because we for us we were meant to get married in april oftwo thousand and twenty okay. So it was that's kind of three weeks before itall sort of shifted gears and my wife and her mom were really head of it andcalled it before the it was forced upon us, and i just had the blaze now she'llbe right and then a few days later they made us move. So i like that kind ofmakes sense, but we found like kind of in december january time, will likeshit. We've got to replan this thing, because we did basically ninety percentof the ground work leading up until april, and then it got pulled and itwas hard to kind of get going. The thing that i found that was the moststressful out of everything i mean there was the time consuming element ofputting all the little pieces together like people and tables and those sortof things. But for me that was the most stressful part is like i'm so muchthinking about everyone else. Like i didn't even think about myself. I waslike, oh if i put this person in this table when i put in fin invite thisperson it's weird like it's almost like you kind of wish in a little bit thatyou wish. You had it again, because you'd focus on the things that the mostimportant, but in saying that, like you, just you kind of want everyone to enjoyit as much as you were as wellso. It's,...

...it's that's. What makes the experienceof the wedding so like a mercie and just so overwhelming right, becausethere's just so many variables, other people other shows for sure yeah verypeople at my wedding hadn't met each other as well. So i'm like how's thisgoing to work yeah. We we had a bit the same like yeah, a lot of people thatknew each other, but then those sort of few people that did it. It was like.What do i put these people like? I love that i know that they're going to getalong with like yeah tie. I think the note you don't want him to feel bad islike i got put on this table with his nan. That it's like no trust me, mynens, are savage like you want to be with my end, that's it exactly right. How did you go about selecting your what's the maid of honor? Is that, likeyour best man, equivalent yeah yeah? Was that a tough decision, an bestwoman, so i kind of played it cool in thesince i didn't have like a maid of honor. I had three prolific, the that is the othoniel and i you know meso like come on, but, like i just couldn't, i was like i love thesepeople. Equally, i couldn't possibly put one on a penis and genuine like being generi love allthree of my girls, so my well, who ended up being technically made ofhonor. Who did a lot more for me in terms of like putting together the hensand night and that sort of thing she was great. She just sort of took it anddid it. Her name is jess and i studied tourism back in the day with her, sothat was really fun. She was my bridesmaid and then i had a girl namedmarie who's. My husband's best girlfriend who lives in queensland, sothat was a bit panicky there for a bit, not knowing whether she was going to beable to get there or not and everything, and then i had my best friend from highschool name manique, so it was good, it was, it was lovely to have them thereand it's all very all very surreal having a wedding and it yeah. It'sfunny. It's like it's happened, but it feels like it's just it didn't evenhave a donation, it yeah yeah, we're very lucky: we've got googledriving out to store all on, but did you guys get a photographer? We did. Wehad a t worth the money like. It was a lot of money, but my gosh. I wasn'tworth it yes. Well. That was one of my mats, so i had three main things that iwanted to like spend money on. It was the venue, it was the celebrate and itwas the photographer because, obviously with photos, you can keep a and that'sreally what i wanted to keep yeah, and i was talking to my mom abouther wedding is just like you know we got to. We had to select, like thirtyphotos to print, and i'm like. Oh my gosh. I have like seven hated photos oi, like sorry, mom technology, that's so good! We had. We had like somuch just really cool uniqueness to is like for us. We got so ouses on thetwelve on the eleventh. We actually got officially married out of our house, sowe had our celebate come over. Do like an intimate, so little presentation, iguess with my family in a couple of friends, but so my dad was actually theunofficial announcement on the day. So he was the one on the mc and he's yeah.He did such a good job. I was so proud of my dad and it was just a perfectrole for him. We knew that he was the right man for the job, so that wasreally cool. It was really heartfelt, and i mean the guy we end up. Pickingfor our official ceremony would have done a great job, but i had this weirdthought of like i wanted. I just wanted no strangers there like, even so. Iactually got married at my own workplace as well, where the golfcourse i work out do venues and i got married there. So i was like, likeeverything was like really comfortable in that regard, and that's the onething i was worried about is like you know, am i going in of my head herelike what happens if i get married at work, the thing it did and it helpsthat i like my job, i guess, but the thing it did is it made me reallycomfortable. I knew where everything was like. I knew sort that at you know. You know i knewevery little detail, so it was really good in that god and and also for melike me, and they can make a promise in high school about being each other'sbest man's, but even to this day we're still best o mate. So i mean terence,was one of my brides made my pride made what i could have been actually withthe hair that he has like he could do whatever he wants, but he was one of mygrooms men, so they go and then chance was sorry. Nick was my best man. So nowthat was that was beautiful as well, and my wife made her own dress. Sheactually made the entire thing made: a daughters dress, yes, she's prettyspecial, so we yeah very happy with how it all wentdown. So that's amazing. I love that. That's so good and i love that you gotmarried. You know in a place that you were comfortable and she made a dressand it was like everything sounds like it was perfect. So that's right and hehe even made the comment as well like it was. It had a laid back field to it,but the staff was still there doing a professional good job and it just kindof kept it clean and everything like that. Didn't e bra, oh absolutely, andi think that's what you want. There's...

...there's a there's, a sense of pressurethat there is on weddings particularly and is coming from someone who's. Youknow getting marest, you know s, you know i have a strong understanding ofhuman psychology. You know it's something it becomes very much about.You know, put on a show kind of situation, and you know whether youwant it or not. That kind of just says you know social breast pressure makesit so so it was really nice that it was something you know it was kind of likewhat you want and a chilote wanted. So that's what made it nice sense. Youknow whether you guys were children. You know so everyone so was everyoneelse. You know, and it was an internal pressure- was more internal thanexternal, but it's still, i guess it derives from the same place. That'sright! That's right! Yeah yeah! So i mean you thought you guys are prettychill like a all the way through. It was just you know, a lot of fun and youknow a couple of times i was just like: oh is charlot gonna. She got a crack ifshe got a stress on. I was like she was like no a well, henext level, a yeah, i feel resin, and then i was just like all right. Iwonder i was just like: is who's going to be the loose card of the nightbecause there's always one? Luckily it wasn't nor loyd was turnedso now. That's pretty impressive was like who's it going to be. Insurprisingly, no wild card showed up so yeah. That's a beautiful thing abouthaving forty to fifty people is like you. Try to you try to in that out and,like hey sorry, coved bro, like we couldn't invite you as too many peoplelike you know. You know that he chakore i had to step in and take down a coupleof people, but we won't talk about that. Now we got, i mean, like you, you knowyou did the speeches. You were the you were the best man so like you had tohandle that best man, ship, but hey anyway. It is what it is. It was a lotof a lot of fun. I the real question try to, but there's no teas under therelike me to well what i could. I tried to fabricate it during when my bridewas walking down this the io. I was like, oh my so myah. No, no, it's not working. I ini did you cry me yep i didn't. Actually.I was super rout of myself. Sorry didn't run the make up. Reckn no, and idid my own make up to so it's impressive. I was too worried thatsomebody else is going to make me look like somebody that i am not so yeah. Iwas walking down the island. I was all smiles and i think i was just it was ashock like. Oh my gosh, everybody that we love this year and yeah. My husbanddid all the cry for us, so it was good. That's cute! That's! What's yourhusband's name! My husband's name is mason mason mason, one looked old mason,we said hi and he looking to have you we did. We so is that mason's last nameas well? Try, maybe i shouldn't give that names or no that's, okay, l yeah!My last name is now tran, which for those people listening, i'm actuallyaustrali like australian, like my parents are europeans, so i don't looklike my last name should be tran me, a l vietnamese, yes, a s funny and i'vehad a lot of fun so far of confusing people when they say the e. You knowpeople when they say that last time they expect a particular looking person,but i show up and they're like now we're looking for haley. How could you accint beautiful way?That's so good- and i guess, like i don't know like i didn't- want to makeit too peston. But it's an interesting question like was he born in australia?Was he did he move to australia when he was young or short? Yes, so he was bornin australia yeah. So it can yeah it's interesting, because alot of people ask him that and he's like you know, i'm australian i like,but where are you from and it's like sure yeah? So it's always an interesting topic andit's you know something that we talk about to because it's like you know oneday, we'll probably have kids and they'll grow up very differently towhat i did, because i didn't have sort of particular experiences because i'mwhite, you know and they'll have rances because they're asian a part agent. Soit is it's a very interesting thing. What was it like? The first sort ofinitial getting to know his parents and that sort of thing was it he's? So he speaks with his it's a bigquestion, a yeah and she was, i think she was more nervousthan i was like she s go and she's been lovely every since i've met her and ithink she's just not super confident with her english. But i might it's okay,like i can understand you we can, you know, have fun and yeah now, she's,lovely and he's health family is lovely too. So it's good! It's good! We getalong well and i love his grandma as well. Even though i can't communicatewith her it's funny, i'm like i need to learn this language, so i can speak tois grouche makes good a contact. She...

...can say hello currently, currently, i'm working thecompany that i've worked for is originally started in china. So i ikind of work with a lot of that culture and, like almost a it's so funny enough.The owners of the company that i work for is a japanese. The wife of theowner is japanese and the husband chinese so from honkon, so theyactually don't speak, teach others language, and you know, they've beentogether for so many years in this brilliant and kind of being around thatculture right. It's so interesting because you obviously i've had friendswho've been of asian atisara, but all of them growing up in australia rightso first iv bein around those around people who are actually you know, grewup in that culture is so different and it's so interesting because they gofrom hyperpituitary to like to telling me of a black color. I be blown they. Actually, surprisingly, reallycaring people like no yearely. They just have that nature, which i feellike you know. I don't want to say that i don't want to take away anything fromthe western society, but i think there's a different style of care that that kind of that culture carries- andit's kind of it's quite pleasure- ful actually to be a very family orientated and it's greatlike just to see them together. They really band together and really carefor each other and it's yeah yeah yeah one of my i had two like. I hadmultiple but my best mate laurence. He was fellow and my other one of my overgood mates. Hims name was chin and he was vietnamese and every time we go totheir party like, i think it was twelve thirty and forty around that age and hewas just like there was like cousins. He had seen for years like a there wasforty or fifty people at a you know at a twelve year olds birthday party- andi was just it felt that was so welcoming as well, but it just felt sobeautiful, because you knew how how femily orientated again they were andhow lovely it was that that was the precedence, and i was pretty lucky thati was brought up in a pretty decently, loving or the household, but there waslike so much rively unnecessarily as well, and we were living separate livesand look how good we're doing these other guys were. Not these other guys,but my best mates were so. Their families were so like they've workedharder than anyone else, so so the there were business owners, they hadbhdra as well, but they were just so caring and loving for each other thatit felt more as like. You were in a more family or an headed atmosphere.Less less about m t yeah is good, more integrated, family orientation inparticular that side. The word and what i find interesting is the bore of thethings that don't e very hard working but- and i noticed- and i was talkingto you someone about this the day i and i said i'm the gym that i go to it hasspacially. I can't believe this is turning into a resting, but anyway thisi go to right. One race, man, the human race, crazy, the team that the gym thati go to margin park open has about ninetypercent population of you know either east ation or west asians, or you knowbasically from either. You know pakistani indians. You know chinesejapanese groping fifty countries in asia a hundred tecon asia, but you knowmaybe you every now and then you see like im, no censer one oke person rightcover the word couple: ozy fellows what waits the column as dogs. I realized. I realized i was like well,you know it's interesting, because it's just a different way of like you knowthey have a different mentality, like you know, even on a public holiday, thelike you know where i'd take a day off, because you know i'm like yeah, theymean it still there. So it's a completely different. It's a veryfascinating mind set and, to be honest, you know i actually you know. I alwaysthought that side of the world was really interesting. I've been reallyinto like the japanese culture out of all of them, so but yeah i always findthat fascinating. Anyway, it's a little bit of attention about race, a beautiful thing. It's a beautiful, myfriend, it's nice to people to talk about it without you know talking about more politicalissues. I think it's nice to have a chat about it. When we just talk aboutwhat you know, what characteristic particular you know, nation has anyway moving on from that,but of the things i guess i was kind of excited about, because i can't talkabout marriage. That's why i was quite the whole time because you know just say a let's: do anyone please toyour best? Please do introduce you know. Moving on to. I know this was the pastcouple of years, where, like a pretty past year, was pretty interesting yearsto say the lesotho obviously was tough for everyone, but obviously you knowyou kind of not only you know survived that you kind ofseems like you thrived, haley right. I,...

...and i think i can kind of say that aswell like i mean there was few things that i did. I was quite proud of that iwould have not done in you know normal circumstances and i know recentlyyou've kind of started. You've been dabbling with starting your ownbusiness right and that's that's something i was really excited to talkabout. It was like, because you know i've kind of gone through the processand you know i get pretty hated up every time. You know someone someonesteps into that ram of you know al to preneurs, because then i could be like.Finally like pop my people. Yes, let's, let's get into that, like you know whatkind of was like the initial thought pattern you like? Oh, let's do this youknow like and like if it helps all kind of start you off like originally when icame up with the idea of like you know, starting my company and which was verydifferent from what i do now, but original idea. So i was like well, ijust don't like the way people do things. You know. I want to do him moreinteresting and more. You know more aesthetic, stet in a moreesthetic way and more you know loving and a more you know more loving way. If that makessense right, i want to bring like almost kind of like a clear aspect to business,and that was my mind set when i started so you low batwas. What was it for youwhen you you like? Oh, let's, you know, start the business and you know what yeah. Let's answer that in thelong sure i think it goes back a little bit further that for me i always knewthat. I wanted to start something, but i didn't know what to do. I was like ihave this drive. I have this passion. I want to be able to do something. I wantto start my own business, but i have no idea what i want to do and i think thatwas really frustrating to make for a long time. I was like. Oh, i have thispassion. I have this like enthusiasm torn to start something, but i haveabsolutely no idea like what i could do so i found that really difficult yeah. I found that really difficult toknow what to start exactly so it took me maybe a year or two to toknow and figure out like what i wanted to do or sort of understand. You knowwhat are my skills on of my strengths and really thinking about that. So yeah know exactly what to start. Soi was doing a little bit of sort of random work here and there on air,tasker and sort of doing free, lancing and just trying a whole bunch of thingsjust to see. You know what i liked and what i was good at a something thati've always which has really funny it, something that i've always reallyenjoyed doing anything good at is typing, and i talked well and fast andi was like: oh, this is really cool. What's your work? What's yer wordrecord part dis a hundred f, but i aver ricus, which sounds riney's. Actually ithink yeah, like average for people is like thirty seven or something likethat. It was a ten coffees like a yes. So it's funny, i remember when iwas about six years old, my dad bought a typing program and what was this?This is like early two sands and he's like sit down you're, going to learnhow to type- and i was like this- is so lame and i, as like the best thing heever did. I was like thank you so much for this skill, like i write, email soquickly, and i can do things so quick a so much quicker than i would have beenable to other wise, so yeah. I hated it back then, but i'm very proud of it nowbut anyway and so yeah. I decided that i wanted to. I had done a little bit oftranscribing work, which is very sissoo. That's now it makes a lot more sense. Iused to be walking fast and hill used to be on our desk and i now like no.She was like that in a way she was like writing essays. I was i was thinking like for me. Likeyou know, the speed is not nearly comparable, but when i type or amessage on my phone i feel like i can closely relate to my my thoughts when iwrite, because i was writing so slow even speaking. Sometimes i would catcha head of myself. I feel like typing and or riding on a key pad. Is he asclose to equivalent as at the way my brain works? Yea a yeah? It's reallyinteresting yeah! I guess writing is like a lot slower. Yeah! That's a goodpoint. I don't know. I find that yeah, it's good to be able to yeah, think andtake smash yeah exactly. I love it. Euston's like why was she ignoring menow? She was just like deep in thought in her typing escapades yeah, so i done a little bit oftranscribing work and essentially what transcribing is essentially like audioto text. So there was a podcast er like a that hadpopped an ad on air taskar and they wanted somebody to transcribe, and ithought oh, i could do that american. I could do that pretty quickly, so icontacted her and sort of put in a bid for that and was able to get the job.And, yes, i did a bit of transcribing...

...work for her. She had a health andfitness podcast, a sort of manifesting and that sort of stuff and yeah, so idid a bit of transcribing for that and was like wow. I could actually do this.This is really cool, so i sort of sat on that for a while and do a little bitof free, lancing here and there, and actually, over this last lock down inmelbourne. I was kind of like you know what i think i just need to do it. Ithink i just need to like build a website and like just do it, and ithink the thing that stopped me so many times is like i don't have this elementof it or i don't know what i gon to do here and i'm like you know what no ijust need to put a website up and like get started and put myself out there.Even if i don't have everything sordid initially like these things will cometogether, let's just like start with a base. So that's pretty much where i'mat at this stage, i've pretty much just put myself out there into the universeand just said: look i'm just going to give this a go, see how i go and sitwhere i go from there. So yeah i'm very much at the beginning of this journey,but i'm excited, i think, because i've sort of pushed past that point that youget to where it's like. Oh should i should i do it. Should i jump shot, ijump and i've actually, i feel like i've, even though i haven't it hasn'tbeen a long time like having made that leap makes me feel really likeencouraged and proud of myself. So yeah yeah, that's my story. So father,that's beautiful and i hit legs. As you started talking i needed to go for atoiler break muti. My microphone offer podcast ing trick. Did you give awaylike your business like? Did you? Did you give yourself a plug? What are you doing? You're a good man you're, a good man. Business is cold and it's, i think it'shilarious. It's hily transcribed, that's sensational. That is sense andhe would have to change the spelling. Would you that's at ten? Oh, my ahmad. I was like you know what i'mjust going to roll with this. I'm just going to go for it. It's great, so yeah,that's sort of how i came up with it and yeah next will be a transportbusiness or maybe i'll, learn another thing to translate. You know it justgoes on and on but yeah. So this business is a transcribing business. Sofor podcast for uni lectures, for we on ives fortele conferences, pretty much anything, that's audio that can be transcribedinto text. I can help you out so yeah. That's that's what i'm doing at themethat trans tastic that a joke i'm allowed to at leasthave one okay, reckon capital, letters trend and then lower case, yeah, verygood, and one of the things a what's the website sure. So it's haleytranscribe com do day use my website. I also have an instar and a link in and aface. Yes, i i only ad e. I will do the linkings awesome right in this piricithat you are doing that and like the good, the good thing is one and i workin marketing right, and i can tell you now these the demand for content isshooting through the roof every single day aright. They know, there's no, notenough cotton creator that can keep up with the demand of that content. That'sactually out there. I mean you think about at the speed of which peopleconsume. Conteritur article right thing and the thing with creating content islike particularly ritin form. It makes it difficult because people find itdifficult to write right because there's an ideology that you need tohave a more structured writing. So so many people like to podcast aremuch easier. However, to things like. So when you talk about a co ride, soyou can probably actually leverage that as well, so you can take a blow, take apodcast and turn that into a block right. So you can turn that into a plugand that could actually be a service. And if you that's a so written blokeand if you just take the bun keyboard that they want to bundle with, you know,you've got yourself a whole business model that thrives on people's most.You know trending trend. I guess we had a for the past, you a couple of years,yeah a hundred percent yeah, and i think that's definitely something thati can see yeah within podcast ng or you know different sort of contentplatforms where yes, there's so much demand for content and so muchopportunity there when it comes to podcast in particular that you could beutilizing. You know the things that you're talkingabout in the podcast or that sort of thing, and if you have a transcriptionof that, not only is it great for content and blogs, and so, like yousaid, but it also opens up your podcast to you, know people that might havehearing in payments or that don't particularly speak english very welland they can, you know, obviously use those as well. So there's a lot ofdifferent benefits to having those transcriptions as well, yeah and and and because now that wehave on the podcast, i'm on just going gonna give you some. You know freemarketing health hare as well.

What you can do is one the one of thepieces of content that would work really well, for you is, if you takefamous monologues in from films like let's say, find a film, that's famousright or you know, just find any pieces of content. That's already pre producedmostly films. I think that'd be the best idea and you know, take the videoand prescribe it at the bottom and and then share that or to your socialspeople find them really interesting because they can read while they woicethis monologue right, and so that would be fairly interesting. I think peoplefind that quite interesting and the spent favit of time owner as well. Youcould use the same manner on tick tock as well. On instate, i was going to sayhow would you execute that? But tick tock would be perfect because you couldhave the words over the top of the video right like yeah, like intarmedesn't have the space. If you need a scroll down on instar, you stop thevideo right, so god reels on instar as well, so yeah a cream half screen would be just. Butwriting and then half screen would be and then it kind of highlights the lineas the people speak. So i don't know. Maybe you take the famous scene of thenote book where he goes to a and then you know you just prescribe that icoue's not that simple explanation, my mission about yeah, but i think that hefeel the something that you could definitely do and then we really s veryquickly. People would people voice things. People are very wherever theycan combine. Senses tends to be the placewhere people pay most of the intention. Hence take talk with music words, sowell, because it's just music yeah anyway, it's a little thimple that it'sfun, because i can be created with it to and implement these differentstrategy. So i appreciate that thinking. That's that's! Okay! Yeah! Well, that'sdifferent me like this, this fun stuff. You can do it so cold on you, i'm very excited for youto see where you go and obviously we have a podcast, and you know i think wecould probably use a blog as all lookin. So you know, if we're going to growthat areas also, that would be fun. You would have to sell me in that avenue,but i'm sure i would believe it as well just i was really curious as to someone,unlike an egg who didn't just run away from the state. Just joking someonewho's currently living is still living in melbourne like the what's the overall. What's your overallthoughts on how like do like, were you born in melbourne like? Is this beenyour place of, but, like you grow up here, this is sort of been where yourheart's been your entire life. I did so. I was born in melbourne. I've been inmelbourne predominantly my whole life, and i lived in england for about twoyears, but came back just before the pet were about in england. I lived inyork in england, it's about a hour of london, so loved it. There yeah loved it loved it, miss it everyday. So i suppose in answering your question is to where my heart is it'spartly hearing, partly there yeah, you feel as though your melbourne's, themost adaptable city to england, and so so yeah tasmania might be closer, butto weather, obviously, but yeah. That's it yeah. Now i do feel like melbourneis pretty similar to england and a lot of ways. Obviously, whether is one ofthose, but i do remember living in england andit getting dark at three thirty and four o'clock in being like well. Howcan i do this and now winter here feels like a breeze because yeah s down atfital, like oh, my gosh, i have an extra as a yeah yeah. I guess gettingback to your question. It's yeah being in melbourne like i do feel like myallegiance is here because it's been where i've lived in australia likepredominantly, but there have been times that i havewanted to run away to brisbane and that's where my husband is originallyfrom, and they have been moments where i've thought we've picked the wrongplace. We should have moved to brisbane yeahwhen we could have before we bought it. Yes, yeah. We live in cough saber rightnow and velvin to about so brisband about four hours away gold coast three,so it's like it ud, potentially be where we would move to next. There's noplans there, but if we were to move like, i feel because being a sydney boy,i still feel like a part of me wants to live in the city and yeah. It's a goodidea, but obviously there's so many different factors, and it's like theold saying like is the grass green on the other side top he said. What's it been like in terms of livingliving through, you know kind of an international standard of lock downthat only melbourne has really experienced sure it's really hard todescribe. I was thinking about this the other day, because i've got a lot offriends in brisbane that i try and describe it to, but it's hard it's. I think the feeling is difficult. Likethis last loftowne in particular, i had that same feeling that i had last yearof like this. A drop in my stomach, like oh gosh, like we, don't know howlong this is going to last it's a sort...

...of a feeling of like oh gosh, like i'm, trapped or like. I can't leave my house,and even if we were not in lock down, i'd, probably be at home, but it's justknowing that i can't go outside or can't leave or can't see friends andfamily, and that sort of thing is quite tricky, obviously were super blessed tohave technology these days, where we can obviously stay in touch with peopleand be connected without being in the same room, which is great and because,just i don't know, it's this feeling of kind of dread. In a way. I don't knowit's tricky yeah. You know, apparently, i'm the sea of positivity a not feeling in lock down, and you know,particularly working in the event industry, it's hard, because we got toa point in melbourne. I feel that we were at a hundred percent capacity andwe could yea. Everyone was sort of getting that confidence back up to goout and, like you know, go to restaurants and go to events and thatsort of thing and now we're sort of starting from scratch.Again, where you know we have capacity limits, and it's really starting fromscratch. It almost feels like when's this going to be over yeah. Ask. Whyask why do we have to down we? Like probably eight weeks, we hadit where we were at the stage where i remote t, driving to the pet station ordroving the shops, and being worried that i was going to be pulled over aworried that i was going to be asked about what i was doing outside of home,and that was the only time that i really was. You know they never shutdown beaches and that sort of thing like i would have been the firstabsolute joker cost harbor. Basically, all we're known for is the weather bestweather in the country, and then the beach is like i would have been there.I would have been jumping fences whatever, but like so the only timethat i really felt disheartened if he will was the times when i was outsideabout to leave my house, and i was like i'm questioning whether i should leaveright now, so i was worried and i don't want to make it political, but it's forme, it's more like observational and it s i'm just curious like, for example,like the next election comes, do you stick with the current people or do youwant to change like do you feel like these people, even though they madesome tough decisions and emotionally they might have put you through certainsituations? Do you want these people in power or do you would you rather, wouldyou rather i dewitt making a political if that's from a sional perspective, from a moralhuman yeah to want? I would like to say daniel, the stonest leader in australia estasan. No. I continue to continue.Please. What's your thoughts, no sigo back and forth like i can completelyunderstand why we have to go into a well, why they choose to put us intolock down and to sort of stop the spread, but then there's times where iam like. Oh, like you know, you know, i lived in england for awhile and seeing how they're going over there and really opening back up, but ialso this is going to be a very all over the place answer. But you know,obviously you know they've had a really difficult time over the last twelvemonths, with their slowly opening up their vaccine levels. Doing really well,whereas here i feel, like you know, we've been locked down. Sikerlymelbourne have been locked down for you know four times over the last fifteenmonths and it's it's hard. You see small businesses suffering, you seepeople losing their livelihoods. You know i was trying to plan a weddingand like that whole industry is just struggling, and that's just one of many.So i do think that that's it's sad to see that sort of thing happening. Iunderstand you know, there's public health implications and that sort ofthing, but if we can't, if we can't live like you know, what's you knowwhat's the point almost sometimes like? That might be a bit of a strong point,but i'm like oh man like how many times do we have to lock down before we canlive our lives. A man i strata has the population. The entirety of the countryhas the population of london right. So, like it's a where you know, even thoughwe have these big cities infrastructure, we have that also that, like ourpopulation like we're almost extremely like we're, always likely to be astrain because we live in such a beautiful country, but now more thanever, we have this perfect happy, medium being like, i understood thereasoning of copying the way other countries did things, but we are likein this perfect spot where we have so much base and there are small popes ofour society that live close together, but we don't have enough people for usto be treated like italy, for example. That have you know again but, like idon't want it to be political, it's more just like analytical for me andjust trying to actually reason through it all and that sort of thing that a itis what it is really a something that i find interesting is like. I wonder howthey'll manage opening borders internationally, because you yeahpassports yeah. I think that'll be really interesting to see how theyrolled that out. So i want to go on your i mean you'll have to getvacated because other countries, you know you have to get the code pass,which i understand it is what it is exactly stepping in right, and i wouldi the way i see it right and i look at australia right, i'm a verydisappointed with those doin government...

...quit. I think, we're a lucky countrybecause of the place we live in right and a lot of the rules and regulationsthat were kind of protected and that we were cheering for were in place becausethey were being in place for years right. You know support things like youknow, job keeper and job seeker and all those things they were. You knowfundamentally with part of our legislation, legislation that been inplace for you know years right. You know so in in time of like crisis, youknow the governments of you know. The federal government has a stepping andwhat not right, however, when it comes down to how this government handle thiswhole pandemic, i think our government did a sub hard job, given that we onlyhave like what you know. Thirty thirty million people all together. You knowso it's like how are you struggling? You know, how do you keep on screwingthis up so badly? How are you not vaccinating people? You know what'swrong with you like oral, and i think you know it's a it's a own going jokewith a bout with the you know, the toying government, you know bat. Thematter is den in trust. Wood came out every week. You know said that all thisright, you know it was nice, but if you really look at what was happening, noone can deny that government made huge mistakes right. Catastrophic mistakes.You know well live in the country where you go a five kilometers over the speedlimit and they send you a one thousand dollar fine right. You know, and andyou're and you're first born right, and so you know- and that's the kind of you know that's howmuch how protective we are. How can we allow a government that basicallycaused us? You know almost two years of our lives, you know because theycouldn't get the shit together. How can we just go? You know what to right?Will let you back in so personally, i'm very disappointed from whether i belabor liberal. I don't think it matters. I think over all the government failedthe people, so yes, that the big words out here a lookin and just to sort of yeah summeras what you said well like definitely felt that this particular last lockdown in melbourne. It felt like it like we had come so far like we got to thezero cases done everything, but it was. You know a floor in the quarantinesystem that you know and it felt like the fault of the government. This timei think everyone was kind of like oh, like we're back and look down, but thisis not our fault. This time like this sucks, you know. That's probably theresounding thought of melbourne for this particular last lock down waseveryone is like man. We come so far now we're back here again and not byour own fault, the testification of full lock downs because they wanted toreally let's get to zero. It's one of the most contagious diseases in thehistory of humanity. We actually don't have many death like we're really lucky,but we're look like i don't know it's just like. I understand that you knowyou don't want to take any chances, but are those chances worth you know,people's businesses like people's livelihood and, like i think so, luckythat it's not affecting me directly but like imagine it's not even businessesto it's, not even businesses. I mean one thing that i would like to say:right is my the fact in the facing prayers of heart. The price of house isnot backing. Go down, is it m is the as my do right, hell fucking rent for anhour, the kitty? More than that one thing that i would like salis this.This whole era is costing us our years in our lives right, yeah, so well thanhaving a quick look bit tilly july, this ridiculous. So this is this- isthis? Is this is fact right when covin nineteen started, i was twenty four,i'm fucking the eies. How does that happen? I mean itdoesn't. I was like. Ah so it's begging bion anyway. The pointis in the five three years. I missed out a lot lot right. So disgusting us,you know years in our lives and all talk with that. Let's talk about howhard is it realistically speaking, to keep people into a freaking hotterhotel, right, yeah hal? You know how how hard it it's pretty easy to justlook people into a theater and just now open the door. You know we don't letthe late comers in you know. You know how it works. It's not that hard. Wedon't let the lid comes in until it's still ready to go. It's not that hard.Just lot the freaking he mate. I think the problem was that abra was insecurity, so that was the siste went cheap on thesecurity mind so as they were into all sorts from the imites up right. Iwanted to hear a question perhaps were both of you right. What's the what's the fuel ofmotivation that keeps you guys taking? What's the to you, nags yeah, totally yeah, that's like yeah, okay! So, likeobviously now you know that's a bit of thing like we actually had a covin baby.Believe it or not. You know she was born in the fourteenth july, twothousand and twenty. So she is a ovid baby. So that's so my my wife is numberone. My wife will always be number one...

...because, as we got married, our soulsbecame one. So i technically the same person you know just as like. I didn'tmake that god made that. So this is what it is. So me, and my wife are thesame person so is number one so providing security, relieving anxietyin terms of financial stresses and her future is definitely massivelyimportant for me. The second one is providing a great example for mydaughter being a good dad, teaching her how to develop and grow and mold inthis world, like i want to be the type of parent that my dad had no idea aboutthe advancements of technology, and you know it's back in my day like i don'twant to be that parent. I want to be ahead of the curve right. So that's mygoal, just you know, facilitating being a good dad,so being a good husband, o being a good dad and then just being a good worker,being a good person being a good friend that sort of thing. So my motivationcomes from my family and then it comes from my friends and everything elselike this. Definitely an internal drivers all and an internal driver thati i need to continue to grow upon. But if i don't first address those first,two primary sources. My family, so my family and friends, my wife, mydaughter, then my internal thing: it's not strong enough to survive by itself.It needs to be external. So that's kind of my answer. I guess that's awesome. I don't know how tohelp that sorry, i ad the wrong decision. Actually he did offer in it. No that's fantastic! I think icompletely resonant with what you said in the sense that, yes, i have like myinitial answers. Like that internal drive, like i have a canal drive, iwant to you know, have these goals. I have these things that i want to do,but literally, if you don't have family andyou're not doing it, for you know the people that you love like that driveeventually is going to wear off like it's not or you shifted somewhere else, becauseyou think it yeah and yeah. That's it yeah exactly so, if i actually thinkabout it a bit deeper and i like venoit, more yeah, it is you know it's, butit's for my family. It's for you know. You know my husband now is well verysimilarly, but also like for my parents, for example, to go: obst mason make sonshot up to mason and my parents, you know who gave up so much for me as well,and that sort of thing so i think, yeah, it's the people around you and i it'smore than that- just sort of like the superficialness of just like thatinternal drive, which is also like an amazing thing and, like obviouslyyou've got a you know if you don't have that it's difficult to start things. Soi'm grateful for that too, but yeah for the people around me and tomake a good example, and i don't have kids yet, but i'm sure one day thatwill be. You know number two on my list as well. So yeah have you. Might you want to answer anyquestion that you can get it? You got a dance away from that one son? No, no! I know all the answers i meanno, i it's in a pet, a different pace of life.I p, i guess from you guys right where you guys have married right and have asignificant of the where i kind of stand. I still stand on them moreintrinsic drive and a lot of my drive comes from there's a huge aspect of where i careabout the people around me. Definitely you know family friends, but i alsocare like i want to make a difference in the world and i most of my drivecomes from the fear of dying in significant. That makes sense right. Soyou know i don't want to be insignificant and to be significant. Idon't see. I don't have to you know change. I have to move mountains, itreally just means, even even if it's something small as being a really goodexample, for you know your family or your kids right. Whatever right. If youwant to be example, a person, i think that's significant enough, i think ialways my biggest fear is to you know be no one. If that makes us, like, youknow, do to die to die and averagin live in ever age life and die and everyachievement you know, and it doesn't take much to set. I guess like to bedifferent from all that. Like you know, all you have to do is you know, justkeep your energy up by three oftens than everyone else, and you know havethe you know have the passion to to you know passua, doctor people and sayhello, and you know just talk to. I think that's kind of where i said andi'm sure a lot of that being is more important than energy. Sorry, caring ismore important than energy. Absolutely absolutely yeah, you know, but i don't.It builds the same thing but yeah, because m g i sometimes see from peopleis artificial. You know what i mean yeah, i think there's a lot of thethere's. Like a you know. I personally i've always had like you have everyonehas a differant right people that kind of say that right, you know you. Let'ssay you know. Pe most people sit that a five right, especially after like workday, you know, or the years like or the years i want it. I didn't want to bethe kind of person who finishes work at...

...five and goes home and watches tv andjust does nothing else, because that's what a person in a five energy or likefight you know us five ships, so tri yeah as so good an that, like i'm happyto sacrifice sleep. If i get to, i don't raly, hang out with you guys,like you podcast or, like you know, you know sketch up with family. I thinkyeah that that's at the moment. That's my drive, i'm sure that will change asi develop more my relationships and all that sum yeah i mean like and want tobecome a husband once to become a dead like you are no longer not worth, and ithink you have something more to live for, but like i've actually beenwondering that recently, like without the situation i'm in now like how wouldi go and there's no? By no means your situationis devalued from ours because you have a significant other whatever else. It'sjust your path that you've! No that's! No! It is what it is. You know yea, ijust don't want you like. As long as you know, and you don't have t yeah forsorting for sure i think with the jokes aside, i'm happy withthat him and i am- and i think that it takes a while to get to the point whereyou're happy with the person who you are and you to to feel like your voice, and you knowyour being is worth hearing and worth existing. I think a lot of peoplesuffer with accitempoli. You know crisis internal accistants crises ofyou know never thinking there enough. I think i am. I have been at a point forfor a while, where i do think. I'm enouf, like you, love that it's verysentially yeah now. Well, that's right! I knew you when you were sixteen madonow you now for sure, but you always had that that in the desire to drive or having morn its supermoral forme personally, so that's why i love you so much a one of the many reasons to itis what it is. A great intimate you just knocked out of the part i feltlike we did. I feel like we knocked this in time, would get but haley trantranta stic effort today, maybe you did so well. Thank you so much for comingon. Thank you. So much for having a is o plau give us a plug, give the peoplea plage for all the millions of people who have continued to sak for the endof the podcast. Let us know where to find you and yeah where we can knowmore about you. I guess sure. Yes, so you can find me on all the socialplatforms. Finally, on haley transcribes face book, hayletranscanadian is linked in website cot come to view yeahfind me on any of those handy, dandy platforms. We take that opportunity to ply ourself checked, come a if you haven't checkedour on check us out on instar, the clever tom is podcast and on teacherand i tunes or apia what i i big boy, shit man. It was that state as well as you, google podcast, just look us upanywhere. I'm sure we'll show up a hundred per cent. If you ain't a etto scriber, you know where to go. Let's go i yoasting to say me, no nick, we no in beautiful guysall it not so good, that's been so fantastic. You are such a great guest yeah. We really appreciate you comingon and pouring out your heart sharing. You know yourself and, and just youknow, making great insight and making us better people ultimately, becausethat's what these sort of conversations build within us. So thank you so muchhaley. Thank you! An ego love you so much. You guys have a great week have agreat day have a good night morning afternoon, when, if you're listening tothis god bless, this has been the clever dummies. Podcast episode, twentyfive baby tell a friend, god bless, you all have a great night get you a.

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