The Clever Dummies Podcast
The Clever Dummies Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

The CDP // Ep28: The Psychology of Motivation

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Hello! In this episode of the Clever Dummies Podcast, we talk a little bit about The Psychology of Motivation among other things like life and its challenges.

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Thank you all so much for joining us. This is episode number twenty eight of the clever dummies podcast. We were recording this on a very, very lovely Friday night, just depending on who you're asking. But yeah, we really appreciate you joining. I'm your host, as always, joined by lockey, as always, joined by a nick. Get ahead of myself here. Big Dog got a big show plan and how he got into their brother. I'm good. I'm good. I'm good. It's a beautiful Friday evening, as they always say. You know, we are. Well, I am still in lockdown and you're in a partial looked on, so it's a poor means walk down if you are a put me as looked up. A perfect, perfect time to be executing a podcast. So you know, big shop land. It's going to be a high energy bank bank show. So pretty excited about this. Yeah, me too, Bro me too. But let's just go through our generic, you know, warm up, I guess, if you will. Obviously we celebrated, you know, celebrated Davis First Birthday and Wednesday. That's a tremendous occasion for anyone that follows me or Charlotte on social media. We blasted it all over but she just put so much effort into the day and presence and cake and just made it all so special. Is like puppy themed and Ay absolutely loved it. She got like a prefer, Prefera of gifts. Her favorite thing is like a little quadbike that she likes to walk on, and then she had this little block. So we got like a building block set and there's like this little red one she can fit in the hand and she was holding onto that trying to steer the car. You try to take the thing out of her hand like she's get really mad. So you know, it's one lesson that you'll learn when you have kids is like you can give them all the stuff, but they'll just pick something there like and then that's it. You know what I mean? Say Yeah, but it was just such a good day and everything else has been pretty good. Sort of getting back into a semi regular training pattern, just letting the body heel up and, yeah, getting some decent bit of feedback from it. Now starting to sort of push through sort of that initial reprogramming phase, if you will, just trying to reteach my body to you know, after you sort of deal with a couple of injuries, particularly when it comes to weightlifting, like you've got to almost relearn the techniques so you're exit quite executing properly and that sort of thing. So it's been been good. I'm finally starting to put some numbers and, yeah, move a bit of weight now. And even though, like you've got to go through that initial phase, you don't get the you don't get the UFI or the release of like Melas Serotonin that you normally would when you're lifting really light, even you know it's been a long time, it doesn't hit the same. And then you start, you know, putting some reps in super setting and then it's like that's the shit. That's been really good. Bro Hobit Yourself, man. Yeah, too bad, not too bad, I know. Well, first of all, how crazy is like, you know, Abbey's the one year old. Insane right, gone so quick. It sounds really yesterday she was born. But you know my boss work, it was like Oh, GC, you must be ready to sit up, saying like six or seven months. I'm like all right, now she's a one. Next Way. He's like what? Like yeah, tiedly right, it goes quick. Hi, goes great. But no, I'm well, you know, obviously not training at the moment. So because of in this lockdown, last couple of days I've been, you know, just last out, well last week or so, I've just been, you know, really lone motivation. Just been kind of grinding it, you know, just trying to go to work and come back trying to do things and just trying to motivate myself to get to do things. But the resistant is almost uncanny, especially because right now is so cold in Sydney at the moment because you know the that that peak of winter right now, that center point. So yeah, when it's cold as well, it's just everything is a little bit harder. Yeah, and then you know you've got the lockdown, so you fall out of the rhythm and there's no rhythm and like, you know, start falling out of those that you know does normally if you lesser, it's like up and then you go down. The cruise down for a bit there is. So there's no rhythms. Everything is just grinding it out. You know, it's like, you know, when you climb a hill in your car and then you eventually go downhill and you car can relax a bit. Right now it's just all uphill you know. Yeah, Bro, but apart from that, given talking about that, apart from that, I'm all good things are could I'm so glad that I don't have coronavirus. So that's fine. There's are the things about you don't live in the field. Yeah, you know, I'm as and you know I've been also been kind of chilling, just playing a few games here and there as well. And you know, by all, by all means, probably, you know, can't, can't complain too much. I think life is still treating me better than I deserve. So it's a beautiful day to be alive. Yeah, that's so. That's a great way to look at it, man. That is the that is the correct psychological approach, if he will. So, now very much a gray and how's the family? Might has the has the kids, and wife now has a brother and everyone else might they could. This little s got a Mrs not anymore.

That's right, but we've all got to go free the right yeah, a few hyge breaks in there as well. Check them. Yeah, that mean, and then you know, you sort it, you know. Yeah, I don't think you can't name one person who's who reached greatness without few hype breaks. In there. Yeah, I mean if someone's on their first love and they're starting up a business, you know something's something's bad to happen. You know, to be lucky. died that. You need that. That heart just stood on, trumped on, bloody spitting up, and then then you can start moving paces. I feel like very true, hundred and ten percent. If you're starting a business and you are finding it hard to get motivated, you know, just get your heart heart broken and you sorted. You know, your own your way to greatness. Might as well start to SPACEX, you know, because you know you're going to succeed. Imagine all the Shitty Copts. A young fellow with that snipe arrive his might like that one. I that just doesn't move. Now, maddy's a he is a damn. You know. Here's what it is. So you know what they say. It's very true. At as. There was this one thing that I was reading about, if I can that Richard Branson now was talking about, which I was sorry about. You know, must sure I had. I had basis in my head and then I'm thinking no brains, and I know that's fucking test. Like there might I put all three of a pretty closs to Gavi and bre e pretty close out. They're just looking into space exploration. Pretty pretty insane humans. I know the people talk a lot of shit about them, about how they're the richest people and they talk about them being billionaires. To be honest, I mean I never understand that because I think first of all, they don't owe anyone anything. They did whatever they did on their own and you know, the fact of the matter is, you know they they play a huge part of the economy, in the economy, and a lot of the people mistake their net worth. It net worth with what amount of money they've got in the bank. Often it is never the case. Like when someone says net worth, it's like I think. I think. I just want to quickly clarify this. If you ever get pay slips, have a look at the net income in there and then the grosser that you get into the bank. Right. So net income means essentially what is in what is under your knee. Doesn't mean they're not really necessarily fluid assets per se. That's just what's under your name, whether that's fluid or not. Even in many cases a net asset can also be owned by a half, by the government or someone else. Yeah, just means publicly read it. You know. Yeah, invests and everything else. That's exactly right. Like, for example, you know, let's Save, My net income is two hundred bucks, right, and that doesn't necessarily mean I own two hundred dollars. Means, you know, there's probably for my case, like there's thirty four thirty five percent text right, you go, okay. Well, first of all, out of that two hundred bucks, you know the government is going to get the part right. Thirty thirty five percent rough for you and you know. And then so they get to keep it. Even though that was under my name. The government still chips it off me. And then you got things like, you know, for the things that, even though it was under my name, still go away, like, for example, my hex loo and still also comes out of, you know, that that net. And then you go then you're then my super also comes out of the net, so to speak. So what I'm saying, like the points, you know me like that net incut, net worth is does not define how much they earned. So, you know, they often most sorry guys. Sorry, Oh good. Often, many times that's even as a person is a poor person, right, there's a poor person. Many people most of the income by that time they get the pay. Let's say if you get paid fortnightly, by the end of the week the income would be seventy sixty five percent gone, and that the amount that you have left is essential, your essential gross so to speak. Yeah, which I only be politically correct term, is low socio economic, not poor. But now, now, I he I'm going to well, I'm doing proser on the clever damage podcast. My Yeah, you don't have to pay. Say it out for me, baby, I'm not broke. I sorted your eyes, but I'll try to help you. Say Face there, but there you just froll. That's fine. No, no, but you're right. And like if you look at someone like a, I mean if you look at anyone who has a lot of assets, like you know, think about how much we pay on car registration. Right. I always think of floyd by weather and this example, because he's actually the first combat sports athlete to ever make a be in dollars sole the off competition. That's not including like sponsorships and all his business ventures. That's just solely or fighting. The prize money is got and the dude fights every years, even in his S, because he just spends as much money as he earns. Even more. He's got you a fifty cars. They all have to be registered, you know, they have all be paid for. He's got to entourage people. Like so much money that's spent through and even if, even if, like, even if someone sells a business and they make a whole lot of money, the amount of people that have to go through to have that business sold in the people that have invested, and then you usually put that somewhere else. Like it's we often like sure, they're rich. Is fucking like to be and as a being, as for a reason. But like they can't just...

...they can't just like get up and leave and take their money to go. Like a lot of those assets are tied down as well. So it's never quite what people what. Once you sort of understand what it's like, it's like, yeah, it's you know, it's hard, like it really is, like there's a lot of money. If you make it a lot of money, you're spending a lot of money too. That's kind of a thing. Even with just sort of shift gears in Ramble, if you will. A lot of business owners during these times, even if they had franchises or they had a lot of money or they had a lot of work, for example. They still have some, pretty much all those bills, but they're getting way less of the income because there's less people willing to spend money, there's less opportunities and that sort of thing. So it's it's a yeah, it's a good thing to be reminded of that. You know, money in that regard is it's never what it seems. And I think linking back to the original point in regards to way people view those guys, is like there's always there's always detractors for successful people and sometimes it is really like, you know, sometimes it is understandable, like, you know, if your Bill Gates in your own Bloody Epstein's flight less, like sure people are going to come after you know, it is what it is. And there's a lot of talk about the way Amazon treat their people and how they are as as individual people, but you know, you don't know that person. So if you're judging the way someone acts personally, like it's difference, like are you look at this person as a business own and all the successes they had, or you look at this person is a human being? Well, like, you know, if we all lived a public life. Like how much, how much of a piece of ship could we look like to say, bit of perspective goes a long way, doesn't it? Got Them might go through to prison. I'm not even yeah, she's going form another a lot of us would, and I mean you might be able to speak to this more, but there's a reason why a lot of those big businesses look to shift their back end around because, like, if you in California, for example, I think their taxes like forty seven percent, like no wonder people are going overseas and having their money over there and it's it's pretty crazy how much like tax is obviously in essential part of a thriving society, but it's pretty crazy how much you you know, it's quite depressing when you're on a decent living, seventy eighty grand a year, like you're sort of in that middlew even higher middle socio economic and might you're still down at that bottom fat that live. I'm sorry to tell you. Absolutely. And that's the thing though, and, like you know, now talking about becoming closer to home, right, like myself. Right, they if I do some calculations right, they would be a huge in fact, here I say almost, you know that twenty five two. You know that thirty percent of the money that I earned. I'm talk talking about taxes. I'm talking I'm not talking about my income, I'm talking about over all money that I have, like you know, that I would be incomes incoming would go to the government. Right, like I said, I'm talking not just taxes. Let's talk, because it's easy to talk about taxes, right, because tax is an essential part and that's the only thing we really see, because that shows up on our you know, shows up on our invoices and our shows up in our accounting systems. You know you're paying GSD and all that stuff. But what the things that we don't talk about, go under the radar, are the the micro ones that you end up paying. Like you know, I talked about tall a lot, because tall itself, the idea, you know, it's pretty incredible. Like you know, I was just looking at it, like everything. You know, I roughly in the last financial years, because I was going through my taxes, staff and your last financial years, I'd roughly paid almost like one Thousan four hundred fifteen hundred dolls or sort tolls. Right, you go, Oh, well, that's not that much. Okay, that's not that much less plus that, you know, let's add that on top of my you know, my tax that I already paid to the government. And then I then the rag show that I paid and when I didn't even drive the car, right, and then chuck on few freaking finds that I got, you know, a couple administration phase, a couple of administration feeling like the finds that you get the fine. So you get like, you know, I mention talked about this early this year. I got a fine for driving a registered car. The only difference was the car was registered in Victoria. By technicality, they did. They said when you intend to move to New South Wales, when you intend in it's intent that actually gets you the fine. So if you decide today that you moving to knee South Wales, you have car becomes unregistered. So on technicality they find me twel hundred doors. I wrote the find on my table right here, right. So you think about all that like well, you know, there's a lot that we can just go to the government and not to mention all the you know, the essentials that thinks that we do like, you know, petrol and you know the cost of living itself and like super expensive and, you know, subscriptions and all these little things out up. Yeah, it's makes the twenty one century big dog that one. You know. So you got all these subscriptions, like, you know, one of the one of the thing, because I was doing the Zoom Yea's finances, is because of text time, and I looked at it, I was like there was so almost so twenty eight percent of the expenses what on its descriptions. But of course,...

...like for a digital business, that's that's not too much. Yeah, you're using them all. That's different platforms and that. Yeah, yeah, but but twenty eight percent of the expenses, that's the huge chunk. That just, you know, so stepped ideas. Not Imagine that. Would like a more, you know, bigger size business. You Got Holy Shit, like weird. It's, you know, you have a business that's, you know, bringing in roughly at net five million dollars at the end of the year, at end of the financial years. I think they're profiting. The profit, net profit of the business or the gross profit of the business, is probably hundred thirty Tho hundred forty thousand. That's it. Going from like, you know, because total business that when you five millions, center thriving economy as well, you know. I mean like that's an at driving economy. Like he can make staff cuts and you can make budget cuts in various areas, like I'm even dealing with this at my my job at the moment. And like the overhead they have, like maintenance, is just like so and they're run by really there, run by someone who's, like the owners, very wealthy in the run by really intelligent people. So they're probably going to be okay, but still there's like a lot of tough decisions that need to be made. And Yeah, and that's that's a that's a relatively big business compad to most in this area and probably it's in that higher percentage across the country as well. So it's yeah, it's it's just another thing. It's another thing that we're going to have to look back on and maybe we don't quite realize the along with mental health in these other things, we don't quite realize the you know, the ramifications that this, you know, the past eighteen months have had on all of us. So, yeah, it's pretty pretty hectic. The the economy of Australia. Person I mean most countries would with the same. I assume it thrives on small businesses, not necessarily those large businesses, because even though they are huge memos businesses that monopolies of their own on their own kind. Like talking about tell Stra, and there, you know, the Telstra of the word. Like you know, Telstra wants practically everything, you know, the infrastructure alone. You know, even though they make a huge done dead because the government is so reliant on them. It's like, you know, it's like essentially having you know, the government is so reliant on them. So they're you know, they have some leniency because the government actually relies on them to start that other way around. You know, the government relies on their infrastructure. I mean, imagine it, Tellsta turns off the Internet at the parliament has you know, because they can do that right. So there they've got the power to do whatever the hell they want. So that, I think that is a whole other level. But you, when you talk about what government thrives on, works off is small businesses and and those high to meet in gume earners, because at that point, like I'm going to slap like tax like like a motherfucker. That government's like no, worries. Will take your money any other week, like everyone else is getting support, but for the past eighteen months I've been like just walking paying tax like no stop. Sure, they get you get like some tax breaks and stuff, but, you know, doesn't doesn't take away from the fact that, you know, they're giving away money like they've got it and I'm like giving to the money like I've got it, to the government. So it's a pretty interesting cycle. But you know, that's something that we all learn to live with. But I think this was we went off track. ME, Julie. Yeah, that's what that's fine, supports. You gotta dig, dig the Pollen. It started. Yeah, this podcasting business is easy, as said the Dane brother. It's easy, easy. said that. They're right, that the main point was right. You don't know, you never know the full story and we've just broken down a few minor aspects. And, like I said, you know, you know, compared to those people, we like broke motherfuckers. I got nothing. Yeah, you know, so it's a whole other word. So, you know, it's hard to talk about things that we don't understand. Bro I was second wake if you need for a semester to and I was we were have. At the moment we're doing online tutorials and I was like, we got broken up in a small groups and we use on through something cross. We use a program called blackboard and they have like a collaborate platform. So basically your classes in there, the teachers there, everything else, and I can that you're up into smaller groups and then you can sort of talk between yourselves. And then I was like we're to come back and report to the group, and then I was like, Oh hey, you know, I'll speak like I've got some notes to you, I know what to say. And then, but I didn't know the content that well and I just started rambling and then I lost where on my notes was because I send it close the table up, like fuck. So like it, it's you know it's and you think about that, like you know that's you think, like fuck, we touch on this subject a lot, but you know, when you hear, when you hear glady and all these jokes, is speak every day. You just you see the same things there and people like I was upset at myself because I hate talking like a Gumby, but people get really defensive in those situations, like a lot of the time disease we need. Yeah,...

...exactly right. So, like in you know, you understand, you understand fuck, you understand a bit of psychology and yeah, this is kind of what we're talking about. Post bloody are sorry, pretty pretty podcast. Like you see a little bit of that behavior in yourself and then you start to see it in everyone else. And Yeah, it certainly opens up a fair wide world, but just try to keep it all into perspective like this. Even the same thing with these inner all players, like or they're making so much money, but like twelve clubs have recently had to go on. They're up in Queensland now for the next four weeks and they can't see their families and everything else. And obviously they're getting paid to play a professional sport and they've got pretty good lives. But still, like, once you live a life for long enough, that Shit becomes normal and your mental health still was affected by those sort of things. Like, obviously for us, because we're not in that world, we would now give our left harm to be paid and me and dollars to play something we love. But when you're living that life like people's mental health needs to be is still affected by it and a lot of those guys have young families and like I couldn't imagine leaving Charlotte for four weeks, like an obvious age. So bit of a spectrum. Yeah, this sort of I thinks. Absolutely, and I think there's a lot of different aspect of that as well. Like you know, it's easier, like you said, it's easier, easier, easy to talk about this shit and then just go, you know, oh, that's the case or whatever. Right, and the problem comes in. It's when you start looking at it and go, you know, our I. You know, I start comparing you to yourself, because you got to remember it's different words, right, that's and that's the that's the key. There's different words. It contin do I just need to check my mic quickly. This is what live, you know, if it was like read what're just worrying about? You about it? I thought's worrying you about? Sure if I'm using my right the right mic. Okay, you're speaking pretty close right now, so the volumes sounds a bit loud now, but I've been able to hear you pretty clearly, so let me let me try this. I'll cut this part out later. Yeah, okay, it's good. All right, don't write that in nights on me. Yeah, Twenty One, twenty, twenty, twenty one, what was the last year? Saying, before I'll be able to keep continuing. Yeah, take a second and then continue chatting. Yeah, so, as I was saying, the thing is it's you when you don't know the context of the thing and you don't are not familiar with that and you start comparing yourself to those scenario ands and aspects of you go well, what the fuck? Like, you know, how am I like? You know, well, I am the one who's affected round, victim. But you know, I guess everyone has their level of problem. So it doesn't really you know, it's hard to compare yourself to those you know some when you're not in someone else's shoes. So I think it's probably a dangerous game where people start playing and like really, and I heard someone talking about it, is like all people who defferend billionaires and people who are famous, is like defending you know, not in not defending them per se. I'm just saying that it's it's probably doing you more harm than good to anyone. You know, it's not gonna it's not gonna ruin their sleep. I can tell you that. You know just what? No point, you know, it's not. Nothing's going to change. It is a society we live in. And another thing is the key thing. We forget. This structure exists because it's because exists, is supported by the people. Why do you think Japazzle is the richest person in the words? Because people cannot stop buying shit. It's People's yeah, it's. If you really think about it, why is Japazzles the richest person in the world? Because, you know, people cannot stop buying shit. And Yeah, you people. It's such a consumer drim and real, you know, like social networks. Like for sure, if most people had a hit list, like a bet, would be on there and you know, there he's done definitely done some shady things and makes you kind of wonder how much in control he is. He's just a face of the brain, but he would be another guy as well that is has being just thrown in that position and and I guess maybe my thoughts, I guess or thought I had to, that was I always like sometimes whenever I see and hear people, and a lot of people will want to just innately it's like a human nature to want to look at the problems of the other people or judge other people and, like I blame for a lot of a lot of things. I blame politics recently anyway doing that, because it's just created like such a polarization between people. And I mean, like we all have played team sports and everything else, so I guess it's in our nature to be competitive against one another. But something that's very toxic about politics and is there's not a lot of people, at least externally, that seemed to be wanting willing to work together, and it's just a very us versus their mentality, and that sort of bleeds into people's everyday lives. So you just almost every opinion you have will be based off that sort of thoat press because you're so deeply invested the right of the left or whatever is sort of happening at the time that you're that bleeds into all our areas and relationships you have with...

...people and it starts to really affect people's behavior and the way people talk. In my mommy's always tell me, and I hate it as a kid, but what comes out of your mouth is in your heart. You know what I mean? Like you're your mouth is. It's just A. It's this the mouthpiece for or for what's in your body. So it's, yeah, it kind of says a lot about when that's people's and being skeptical and all these sort of things are great, like, and that's healthy, but it's just so clear that the amount of people that feel very strongly in that regarded like. It concerns me, you know, for sure, and I think the one of the things that happens often is we forget that a lot of the narrative that we have, the words we say, the things that we use and the way when we think, is actually narrated by often, more often than not, people who are benefiting it right or benefiting it off the particular narrative. Right now, I mean to be honest, and I said this before over and over again, a lot of the words that we even in this podcast, that unit did, and I like to think we're pretty, you know, almost a very we kind of, you know, we constructualize things a lot better than other people. Not I'm not saying we're smarter, but I think it's just we would we have that or CD personality where we, you know, we just start looking into things more and more right and I think you and I both have that a little bit, right. So, even though we are have that like kind of the concertualization of things, but even like I find myself using the same words that I hear, you know, from the media, the news, or the you know, from the you know, the for them, from the government. Like if you ever think about why is it that a particular day, you know, Gladys Ver juiculan would be standing somewhere to do a press conference, another day it should be standing somewhere else, like that's all controlled by like it's it's a controlled environment to the to basically give you the kind of behavior like, you know, then, more if, to give you the kind of feelings that to change the idea of what they're trying to convince you know. So it's very like it's a high level psycology. I'm sure there's a lot of psychologist behind it, like, you know, giving them the what to do. And the same thing with the you know what kind of things that are. President says in America will like I'm whenever a want that. That's really good point, right, you know. So a lot of those things are so already so narrated, and then a lot of it's not driven by like Super Smart speech writers and all those kind of people. You know those guys are genius. Is he in new luguistic programming and like the kind of things that you can say, and you know you often, let's say, you listen. The simple act of new linguistic programming. Is this right? If you listen to a sentence that I say to you, for example, I say the you know, the word is you know you can do this. The word is, you know, the world is for your food taking right. me saying this long sentence gets you hyped up. That's new leguisting program because it's changes your emotional state, because you go from one state to another. Right now, that was just my voice. Now let's let me. Let if you put me in like a ring right and change the video to black and white and I'm boxing, and then you said, all of a sudden, that's more motivating. That's near linguistic programming, because your brain is associating a whole bunch of different feelings with the particular anchor point. So that's you know, those kind of things as some advanced psychology their right. But with the point is our native is controlled to begin with. It's so it's easy to fall into that loop and just go go ahead and buy into the most definitely, and like you, you've studied media as I have as well, like media programming is just such a finely tuned machine like that. What makes a really good news reader or or someone who's on like a news program even like sunrise one of those early mornings, is they don't just have like the personality and they know how to speak well and they make you feel like you're one of them, but they know that after this add break they have to speak for four nine are four minutes and fifty nine minutes and then, but they're not going to go any longer because they through studies they realize that after five minutes people lose attention. So after at that four minute fifty nine, Bang they changed the new story and they play a sound with it as well. They don't just shift over and start talking, they play this sound. So even if you're sort of staring at the TV not listening, you sort of get prompted by this noise and it's like Oh, here we go again, and then that's how they use that's that's kind of the brilliance of television as well, and people kind of go down the rabbit hole and they talk about their psychologically programming people to believe and think a certain win. It's like, well, you better believe, you better believe they are the trying to be as effective with their product as possible. That's what keeps people coming back and listening, like it's a ratings game at the end of the day. For sure. It's so interesting how deep all that goes into. Like it makes sure, and that's what I do as a marketer. That's like literally my job and that's what so and you know, I'm not even that good of a market I'm do some genius marketers out there with like multipycology, got psychology p these with them. Right. You think about like something small. I can give to you example. Right, something small as adding a timer to like an email will improve the commotions by ten percent, because people are people. Psychology, psychologically speaking, our tune to look at time because...

...everyone is dying. So by's just like I better get this, not because you know it's that the so it's a lot of those things. Essentially, these are, you know, anchor points that were essential feelings that we already have in our mind that you know, we just associate different things with so anchoring is the name of the game, I guess. Did you have any game anymore to say about that? Yeah, because and I think I think we've ripped open that one. You know, we can almost clow around there, and those are those are that's kind of a little bit ever defould at the moment, but because so prevalent and it's I feel like it's something that needs to be continuously explored and it also needs to be monitored as well, like we need to be constantly questioning everything, and that's a really good concept I live by. So we always, as always hit a nail on the head. So I guess we might as well kind of get to what the main theme of what what the main theme of this podcast was going to be, and like it's the back and forth is really good because you sort of laid a really good platform for psychology there, in the way people are able to manipulate other people in regards to consumption of media or or products. So that sort of thing. But so I don't want to make this like a lecture where I'm telling you things I would like. I wanted to interject and if you have any thoughts and theories. That would be really great. But basically there is a really there's a key concept that psychology is a lot of psychology, particularly psychology, even regards to motivation and the getting people to act or do a certain thing, and that's that's just that's called behaviorism. So that was first sort of founded, if you were or at least pender paper. I believe this is one of those things that people since the beginning of time would ever realize that if I do a certain thing to a certain group of people, I can make it behave a certain way. But it wasn't documented until about a hundred years ago. So there's a really famous psychologist name Ivan have love, and he's sort of considered the grandfather of behaviorism, so in a psychological context, and he had this really famous experiment, and I won't really go into the experiment now because it kind of leads us away from the key things that I wanted to talk about, but basically he had a dog and he would he wanted to see how could I make this dog act or do a certain way, so he would give the dog some food, the dog would wag its tail or to be really happy, and then he would sort of reward the dog by doing that. Eventually he or he was able to wean the dog off the food and even just by the scent, the dog was able to start salivating, was wagging his tail, was pretty empting like Oh hey, I'm going to get this thing and and have love. Sort of put two and two together. It's a concept called classical conditioning where basically, if you're prompted by a stimuli, for a example, the dog was prompted by food, he would start salivating, you know, he would get really happy and that sort of thing. And people are the same way. Like trauma. A lot of studies on trauma are based off the same sort of context. Like if you you know, if you abused as a young person, for example, certain smells and sounds can trigger, you know, your heart rate to spike and that sort of thing. But kind of where PA Loov fell off and where behaviorism evolved into was a few years later and where they started to think about cognitive behaviorism. So have loof sort of didn't really take the psychological or mental approach to his behavioral he fought basically the way people act is based off solely off their actions and the physical world, like who's in front of me? That's why I'm doing this. What needs to be done? That's why I'm doing this. They started to realize that sure, the physical world has a big impact on our actions, but the non physical world does as well, like our thoughts. We can start to change the way we view and see and speak to other people, and they really went down particularly, as I said, in the field of motivation. They really started to focus on cognitive behaviorism and trying to understand why people act and do certain way do things a certain way. And the context I'm going to talk about now is in regards to exercise, just because it's a really easy way to link it in in this theory is called selfdetermination theory, and this is based off running basically. So the the concept kind of has six main key elements to it. Are, and this is kind of from a load to high motivation standpoint. So low motivation means like, I don't really these tools, I don't really care so much about and high is like, yes, this is something that I want to do and I'm inspired by the same thing can be taken into consideration with relationships with people's businesses, like everything else. So I a motivated person doesn't see any. Example I'm going to use is running, because it's a really easy, really easy exercise that basically anyone can do. So they sort of studied running because it's you don't need a lot of money to study this sort of thing. You can just get people to run right. So a motivate people have no purpose in running. External Regulation is is the external world that affects your action. So you might want to please a friend or a spouse and I start running because, hey, this person wants me to run with them or they're going to think...

...more of me. There's another form of motivation, and I will be perfectly honest like this, I'll use this a lot, and this is actually one of in a healthy or unhealthy way, that I've used a lot recently. It's called intrat ejected regulation, and that's basically you would run to avoid guilt, and the amount of times that I have gone to the gym recently or Friggin for years, because I'm like, I'd feel guilty if I didn't do it right, that's really a big one. But it's still considered a relatively low form of motivation because that can easily eb and flow like you can eventually just get so guilty where you don't feel like doing it, or you could your feelings can override that. So it sort of starts to move in a more positive manner, identified regulation. So you're going into a sense of identity. So you choose to run because it's like, okay, I'm like this is a part of who I am. It's like I'm a lifter, I'm a runner, I'm this sort of person. So you start to have taken on as a part of your identity. That one is a lot more it's a lot more of a confident form of motivation, I guess. And you also integrate that with your lifestyle to so like your plan your days around your activity and that sort of thing. And in the highest form is just called intrinsic, and this is really a hard one to get to, and and that's you run for fun because you actually enjoy the activity. And to take a step back, integrated is also habit building and that sort of thing, and it speaks about like how to build a habit and once you start to identify as a runner, you can actually start to create some pathways in your brain where it helps you build those habits, like you've actually if you're resisting for a really long time, you could. You could hold back on enough and you stop doing it. If you start to go hey, this is just who I am now, this is something I do, almost immediately you can start to build a habit. That's kind of a really interesting way to think about habit building as well. It's not just looking at it as something I do, but actually looking at is like something that's a part of you. So kind of the lower end, just to reiterate that, is a motivation. So you basically see no purpose in doing it, or it's an external thing where, hey, external things often get us to do a lot of stuff, like it gets us to act a lot away, but it's very susceptible to the world we're living in. And then once we get this thing more integrated into our personalities and we get enjoyment out of it or we make it a part of our like a habitual thing, because we just start to identify with it, then this kind of like it becomes more effective and you can call it. You can kind of use that as a way to help people do certain things. Like if you had a friend you know they wanted to start exercising and it's like all before we just tell them what to do or give them a program and say do this. You kind of got to realize that where they are and it's like do they just really hate this thing and they just don't want to do it? Well, ok, we can do something else. Or do they actually want to do it but they just don't know how? Do they don't have the education? Well, actually, that's really easy to work with. We can give them the education and they'll start doing it. So I thought that was a really interesting concept there. If you wanted to look more into it, was called selfdetermination theory. That came around in the so about fifty or sixty years after they studying behaviorism. It was a guy named Edward Decki, and that's to the concept they use in health science and they use in the legal system today, where they figure out how do we get people to act a certain way. So yeah, there you go, I guess kind of my my kind of main takeaway from that was, and like I spewed a lot of information there, but it's it was really linking it towards this, particularly when you put into consideration like when we stimulated by stress or you know, we're in lockdown at the moment and we're hearing about these cases every day. Or we're not sure. You know, we're not sure about we're like our income, if you're a business owner, for example, like we're not sure how that's all going to go. This kind of ways to there's ways to stay motivated by just understanding that we can control what we can control, and that's by doing our actions, and then everything else outside of our control isn't really even discussed too much in behaviors and because there's actually no applicable way to measure it, because we've ever, you know, we either do that because we can control it or we can't. So that's kind of helped me a little bit, as well as realizing if I have stress from things that I can't control, then like I can actually do a lot about it by not doing nothing at all because there's nothing I can do. But yeah, they go might so much to unpack their right, so much, so much to unpack there. Right. So one of the things I was going to say just quickly. Right. So I think there's a few parts to that. Right. One of the things I mean now I can probably touch a little bit about, like consumer psychology as well, like one of the just do and getting people to act, getting people to do act on certain things that, like a lot of his and studentsick the extrinsic drive right so often. And then one of the things is people and do the bit. The kind of links it back to that as well, that you know, that motivation of easing the pain, so to speak, because a lot of it, a lot of it, a lot of the motivation or a lot of the goal of these things that...

...we do. You know, either the do goals, right, you know, and this is this is at a very micro level, right. I'm not talking about a macro level where we toss start talking about self actualization stuff, where we dominate micro level. Often goals is to ease the pain or to you know, or maybe this is more of a macro level. Right. The goals are is the pain or you know. The second one is avoid the pain from the future. Right. So you know. So those those two things that you'd be doing. And then there's another one is to you know, making sure, you know, at a at a core level, that our you know, our gene survives and whatnot. Right. So a lot of that time, like, for example, we give when people to act on certain things, would say, Hey, you know, you know. Well, if you buy this product, you know you have a high chance of your gene surviving. Second one is you is your pain, like you know, by this medicine, and then this is it, like you'll be the solution to all your problems. And that's why, if you ever realize in life these so many of those gadgets or a particular gadget, when I say I catch it, I mean any service or a product. Right when I pretty any gadget often the one with the most amount of functions. So, you know, often called the most bank for you buck is the most you know, desirable, because that's why I like, for example, you know, people would look into doing excess like exercisel a forty five. You're like, Oh, I will get fit, I will get stronger, I will lose fat all at once, because it's like cardio and weightlifting combined. But often it's not really the case because you know you can't find you know, there's no one fit or solution ever. Right. So, so there's a whole bunch of aspects and one of the things interesting when you were talking lock and I sort of quite interesting. You know, Oh, I've I hear I send you that picture of that. I kind of realized halfway through I should have actually given this to you as I was reading it, because it would have made probably made it a little bit easier to follow fixing when I started talking about the load of high it was. But anyway, we could put that on. We can put that on our whole more awesome people can have a look at it and maybe you're on our social two, you know, for for a huge part and tell me what you think of this. For a huge chunk of my life I was motivated by resent if that makes sense. Yeah, yeah, and that I still do find interesting and the funny thing is I've learn grown as I've grown up, right, and now I will kind of talk little a little bit about like the way the biology of it r'd like, you know, a lot of that hatred, or not necessarily hatred, that that context, that of like the world is against me and I'm against. The word kind of sits on that, you know, swibbler context of the frontal lobe, if you'se, if you will write. It's very memory driven and it's very, you know, experiential, right, so it's very consciousness and and a lot of that motivates you is because you're a once again trying to you know, trying to arrange your life in a way where, you know, I'm multi essentially kind of similar to what you were saying. Motivated by? What did you say motivated by? Yeah, so this one, I think, is called interjected regulation, and the exampire years was running to avoid guilt. But this is only a specific example. It's internalized reasons for action. So in in total, motivation is causing you to act or feel a certain way, for example, that guilt are not the guilt to the resentment being a lead. And it's a selfimposed pressure as well. It's not accidental thing. It's all it's interjected from inside. Yeah, yeah, and I the thing is I realized at a certain point. I think I can't exactly tell you what was that point. What was that point? But there I realized at a point I was like man, this is psych heavy shit to carry around like all day long. You know, yeah, there's no there's no reason to, because I am who I am, like, you know, there's no reason to have to like carry around this burden of like continues to try and do you know, reach be a certain way, because I'd realize, well, Hey, I'm a person who goes to the gym, like I am literally a left like, you know, that's who that's what I do, like or something like. You know, I work in business, like that's who I am. I'm a you know, like a it changed from and that was a funny part, like the moment before that, I was like, for example, career. Wise, I was selling career because I was like driven by this uncanny hunger and like, you know, motivation, which was nonstoppable. So I push my body to its limit, you know, working like around the clock times, right. So that's when I was like, you know, not always fully function, like I wouldn't be a hundred percent effective, but I would do more, if that makes sense, right, and not realize I want to the day I realized that, I was like, hold on a minute, I can do that. You know, why do I need to be so, like so hard to push like, you know, it was almost like, you know, it was like kind of like a flick of a switch for me to go. You know, why am I, you know, running on this tread mill for sort of speak, or if I can just go for a walk like, if that makes sense. Yeah, yeah, so it's one of those things. It's not it's not...

...something you could it's not something you can actually fix and solve by, you know, completing a certain amount of work. It's I guess you can argue it's a pretty powerful form of motivation because it's kind of a name. It's an endless pit, but it can become very toxic and obviously it can also bleed into, you know, other areas of your life, like this is now. I want it before I think what I think? What? Where do you reckon that came from? I think it probably came from earlier school, schooling. The funny thing is a lot of people say are schooling is a small part, and I I don't believe that. I think schooling plays a huge part of your life. Yeah, in fact, Ain Develops up until we're twenty five years old. So things that happened, I don't before that age like can literally affect people for the rest of the life, and it often does, like it for sure. Yeah, and I think a lot of the things that I I the way I am today and who I am today, my beliefs are, my thoughts come from a lot of my experience at school, whether for better or worst, right, for you know, good or bad. Right. So I'm not saying necessarily all bad, because I think I kind of I respect myself as a person. So I don't think it was all bad, but, you know, I definitely do think certain aspects of it did come from that and and that's where it came from as well. So cool school is a very because thing is right, a kid, a child, and that's what they are, right all the way through to the school, even to the end of thing. You are a child, right, even if you're total night eighteen coming out of school, you essentially still don't really have the full construalization of the word. So you're coming out as a child. But a child doesn't really care if you have a quirt, like you know, if you are you know, have this incredible thought patterns and you know you're good at this thing. They don't care about that. They don't care about your personality. They care about the shiny issues and you know they care about the attention's attention, right. You know, that's what they care about, like how much attention you can get a lot. And thing is sends bad because a lot of these kids have like hyper abandonment issues and because, you know from bad parenting, and I'm talking about I'm talking about like microde you know, interest, like you know, and a very, you know, at a very subconscious level. But these people carry around a bannerment issues and then, you know, any attention they can get is important. So yeah, and then someone else who starts like you know, if you're a kind of person who doesn't fit in the Groove, and then you know you're problematic. So there's a whole bunch of things and I think they carry over and then that's when you end up with, you know, that level of different that motivation, trivement, which says I'm saying like it's not necessarily bad thing, because they left me to why I'm today. But it is a heavy burden to carry on. So if you can find a way to flick you keep the same level of spar like, but flick it to hey, like this is, you know, life is not. So it's not as resistant. It's like a resistant that you place on yourself for no reason, like you know. It's almost like, yeah, it's hard to explain, but you can envisioned, like I just you know, it's almost like grinding your teeth of all the time and you just don't need to, or like, you know, pressing your jaw together holding it, or when you can just let it go, you know, sort of speak Nice. Definitely, you know, it's that, that feeling. So it's really interesting because that happens right and a lot of I'm sure that's not just me, a lot of people are probably driven by that anger and resentment. It's that does end. Often that resentment is not even focused towards anyone, it's just yeah, so that's interesting as well. Yeah, it's just like it's a repeated it's repeated thoughts or feelings that you've had throughout your life and it becomes you know, becomes a part of identity, and that's why mental health is so important and oftentimes little issues can grow because we continue to just build on these these ways of thinking and everything else. Like for you personally, like you migrated from multiple countries. You came to Australia at a pretty young age, where kids were freaking brutal, and you should you are still learning the language and the way, particularly Australians just weird, the way we speak, and you had were constantly on the move and trying to figure things out. So you had a lot of your key developmental years, particularly free puberty. I feel like puberty's like that key time where where things just take off and everything's Heighen, you know what I mean. So that totally and I understand that and I knew that about you. But I loved it about you that you're resential, barst but obviously, as well, as we're getting older and as we're growing, like you know, that's not really a part of who you are now. At least I can't see any negative effects of it. Obviously you live with yourself, so you you know, you know more, but is that? Does that kind of make sense? For sure? And for sure I think one of the things he is later on, I am a lot more, so much more. One of the things that I probably more hyper aware of that, and this is kind of what we're talking about before, is all that hyper awareness now that I know and I was able to concidualize exactly what I bought my process was. I'm so hyper aware of it. So my little sister, I'm so, always, so worried about, like you know, her going down that part, because it's a freaking you know, it's a toxic pat so I don't think it makes any bad long term effects that I can see per se,...

...apart from apart from, you know, being short tempered at times, at very few times, you know, certain triggers. You know about that. I don't think so as a restaurant it's interesting. Yeah, exactly. So it's I think it's interesting because, you know, it's interesting because I don't think I have any side effects. But eventually that, you know, those habits that I did build my body was built against. Its actually a brain at the part of the brain are responsible for this is kind of like, you know, it's kind of hit between the little SIS terribral contact context, right, and it's kind of the middle part. It's called Basil Ganglia. I think that's also Anghali. Yeah, they were Basil Gangali, right. So that's kind of the part. Like that's also like where urticular activation system sits and stuff. So that part is kind of kind of responsible for your identity almost as well, because that's more subconscious. So so often when you start doing things like you know, and a lot of like habits as well, like so those habits are so intrinsically drip, like you know, why didn't you that? You just do. You know, some people may do like a click of a hand or whatever. Right. So those things, I think I'm from those that Basil Gang gangle I. So what's interesting is even though that period that I was kind of resentful for and driven by this motivation, those things still became part of my identity and then later was re turned around. Go well, I don't want to do these things. Was Way was more of a more of a challenge than to keep doing them. So it's interesting. So either way, if you can, you know, find that motivation, like you were speaking about, with it, you know, even if it is the what was that word that you said? Lock let again, I thought really like that one about vice, race someone that I used. Yeah, yeah, yeah, intro dejected, right. Yeah, projected, right, even if it doesn't internalize reason for action, it's dot of in part age pressure, right. Yeah, even if it is that self imposed pressure, if you do it long enough and you have a you know, smart way to get out of it, you know it can actually still do some good. So it's definitely it's interesting to talk about that because right now it's probably the perfect time to talk about it, because right now, like I was saying, yeah, for the beginning, beginning of the PODCAST, I'm struggling with a motivation. It's because a lot of those are a lot of those a lot of those things that I was just talking about. That is probably related to my you know, my rhythm, which oft comes from the ridiculous active reticular activation system, also part of the Basil Gangle Gangle Ie, is that, you know, my rhythm goes like I'm not going to the team anymore, I'm not the out and about, I'm not meeting people, not talking about that's like ninety percent of my personalities. What's your personality? Yeah, I go to the gym and I talked to people. You know, it's essentially that's what it is, and those two things that I can't do, that that play such a huge part in my reality per se. It makes a huge dent. And and then, you know, there's another aspect of it, like I was just saying, local. Originally, in the first lockdown, I was able to do a lot more and that was probably different because it was new and there was that novelty effect to it. Yeah, my stand now now it's more so this way to any stop and start. So you started, you know, you start picking up new personality traits of like, you know, start getting used to this new stimulus of actually just going you know what fuck, I'm just a lazy person now because, and I think that's where the real problem starts, starting, because big part of your brain, and that's when it goes to, you know, your scribler Cortex, you're part of your brain knows that these are you're not doing the things that you want to do, you know, because they were so wide inside you. But your brain is also getting used to not doing those things by with this, you know, lock down over and over again and used to accepting this reality. And that's a scary but that we start to accept this reality of just continues going into locked now whenever you know, glad, it's very joken, feels like it, or you know what, then you Andrew's goes, you know, locked out. So it's interesting that we're accepting this is the reality and Mont as our brains do. You know, that's the thing. Our humans are very adaptable. They'll adapt to anything. And Yeah, eventually we come up with this really motivation inner conflict of to do or not to do, to be or not to be. That is the question whether it's no Bo them suffer the slings and arrows of outrage. Is Fortune Direct quite know what movie is that? That's from the the Shakespeare play. Yeah, Hamlet. I'm okay, mad dog, my shareot to a say, AH, it's got today. Yeah, anyway, that was a lot fair bit of do I guess decode and does decipher and yeah, thought's now a hundred percent like if you rounded out what I was kind of saying in a lot of ways. And he applied...

...it very practically to yourself. And that's what's so interesting about psychology is understanding its relationship to every aspect of our life and the way l behaviors are affected by so many different things. Forever it comes to and what motivates us, so like the external, the internal regulations and that sort of thing, and it's just very it's very practical. So it's really good to have a good understanding. And there is analysis by paralysis as well. You can start to over and eyes and look at all these other things. But you know, in a time like where we are now, it's definitely I feel like it's important. It's important that people look into these sort of concepts and a lot of a lot of the time you can learn. You don't have to have formal education, like you can just listen to people who, like Jordan peace and is always a really good example, but he's a lot of his focus is often times a sort of social policies. If you if you were to listen to someone who has a really good understanding of the brain and like there's a really good series on youtube. There's a doctor in the US. Her name is caroline leaf. If you wanted to check it out, there's a youtube she does with a with a pastor in the US named Stephen Verdict, and it's called triggered and she speaks for about fifty minutes and she's a neuroscientist and like a really smart person and names Caroline leath. She's written heaps of books and you can kind of get an understanding of the way our brain instinctively, reactively and subconsciously does a lot of the things that we do and maybe the reason why we are going to these thought patterns, like how much of our past has in relationship to like our default settings on certain things and certain people like even to this day, like I'm always been unconfrontational and if I am in a situation that could potentially be perceived as confrontational. It's not even going to be confrontation, but if I can create some sort of reception that's going to be confrontational, then my default setting will start to come out and I'll start laughing and I'll start carrying on Yahoo and try to de escalate the situation, like it's really strange and interesting. But like then you can start so identified in other people when, for example, like someone stressed out. You can hear it in their voice, and that would explain why all the Times you know you're hearing glad he speak and she's sort of rambling a bit and you like she doesn't really know what she's talking about, because no one really knows. Like this is such a unique time in history, and that's kind of the the beauty in the sense of what we're going through right now. My maybe the last thought is, like what do you think? It's? The most important thing, I think, right now is just to stay in contact with as many people as possible, I feel like, or at least quality contact with a circle of people, because the last thing people need right now is to feel like a fill alone. I believe yeah, yeah, I think these probably yeah, you're right. I mean I think these levels to that. I think, for example, at the moment, because I spent like all day with people, right, I go to work and there's people are on me and I come home and as my family are on me and there's no disconnect for that right, I'm finding I really don't want to talk to people on the phone, if that makes sense. This might be a work thing or just my particular Gar scenario, but, you know, few friends called me and I just couldn't wait to get off the photo. That makes sense. It's probably also because there's not much to talk about as well, like about from just covid nineteen. I just don't want to fuck it talk about it. Totally. Right, yeah, but but I would, I would do a whole that episode on it, though. Yes, but that's what we're able to to. We're able, we're able to go down rabbit holes. It is tough, yeah, like it's even tough in this context to to make, you know, make good content for a podcasts. And like we've always said that the reason for this podcast was ultimately just try to help other people. But like in this infancy stage it's really just about expressing ourselves. And I mean like you know, when current events is like a pretty big do and it's actually really good. It's actually really good outlet to use. And this is sort of like pulling the wall back on the PODCAST, like who really cares, but like current events is really good because it's like very prevalent. It's also constantly changing, so you've got this influx of new things. Well, when the current event is one of two things, covid and lockdowns, it's like you know, you've got it, you've got to got to try to figure it out. So yeah, I think honestly, and and one of the things I always said right, right, it's documentation of our life. I mean, no one's going to listen to it and I I know I can force my kids to listen to it, so they would have a choice. Those bustards right. I mean to to date, I think we've roughly outstand if you still think that your kids are not going to have a choice, man, you're in for. You're going to be too kind harded to your kids right to letter. Last one of the things, like I was just saying, to looklands like roughly at this stage we've all we've got almost forty hours of recording of just, you know, US talking, which is incredible. Like how many people can say they have forty hours of, you know, their thoughts at US different times in life, you know, a different month and dated person and catalog for you for your own listening person, like you know, it's being incredible.

I think that's what makes life interesting as well. It's kind of like journaling as well with a friend. So there's a lot to it, I think. I think that this is an outlet and the kind of goes back into what we're talking about. You know, there's so many will we can easily carry around the weight of our own, you know, of our own fields, if you will. Yeah, and you know, talking to a friend does make a different and you're right actually. You know, probably the best thing for anyone to do is not feel alone in this time, because I think the probably the reason I said that it was kind of, you know, coming from my ignorant point of view, is the fact that I said that is because there's so many people around me. So I am it's not prevalent. Yeah, it's not prevalent. I think for someone who doesn't have this outlet or doesn't have those people around them, it's could be a very tough time. So it's probably worth actually checking up on people. Even though I don't feel like talking to anyone, I should talk to people, not for my sake, you know, for other people. Say so when? When? When? or in like a little bit of that dire straight sometimes likes when. That's when we can get most of her action done. Like if your business is on the brink of destruction, that's when you dendly tend to dig your heels in. So it's easy, not when you're comfortable, but it's easy when you've got a like a abundance of things. Cannot act in a certain way, but you could easily help someone else out by the way. You know, if you're feeling like you're pretty all set, well giving someone else a little odd and hey, that's what we're doing on this podcast, sort of vicressly as well. And you know, maybe one day, if we ever start doing live podcast like I'm a little bit reserved to it because then it feels too much like radio. But we could obviously, you know, we could. Obviously, then people that are listening can make their comments about certain things and that could help lead conversation or they could ask questions and that would be really cool. Like I feel like question answering is like really my favorite thing to do. Yeah, HMM. But then the one of the work, there's a risk that no one does it, and then we just got to pretend like nothing's happen to you know, like one last looks yeah, or yeah, that's right, a fakes Jo's been from newcast. Yeah, that's all the classic right Ed Trick. Yeah, we got to so, basically on radio, you know, we would advertise our phone, the phone number, and get people to request the songs or a topic. And you know, every now and again you say, I thanks John from Cabra matter his because of the song, and there was no John from caramanner. But Hey, secret to the business man. You don't want to pull the curtain back to far. No, not at all, not at all. You don't want to give away too much, but I just love hints. Yeah, let people wonder. It's a lot of interesting right. I think. I think before before we get into a little bit more of a chat, I these few things I want to do, want to say. Right, I know this in this podcast. I don't. I know there was a kind of actually similar theme, regardless of where we were right. It's a lot about who you are as a person and I think in life things will get tough and you know, people will be better than you did. Every day they'll be. There will be a billionaire out there. There will be a billionaire out there. You know that you will never achieve their level level of life. I think that's all part of life, just like how you know, I think it's all over the play and it's not necessarily bad or good, but see, it is what it is. I can't believe I said that again, but you know, it is, though, it is, you know. So I think the best thing in a post, and we said it, yeah, you know, the best thing for yourself to do is to, you know, have your dreams. You know, and you know and dream them and live them as well. You know, there's a really wonderful coat that I was kind of segueing towards because I've been playing games and I read this quad and I really want to read this out on podcast. I was trying to figure out how if I can fit this in. So I think kind of makes sense right. This is by a Te Lawrence, I think he was it was archeologist back in his time. The code goes. All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dustry recesses of their minds wake up in the day to find it was vanity. It will it was vanity. But the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes to make it possible. The really the reason I see this now because I really like this quade and whatever. I like a court, I like to share it right side it again, say they quite again. I would. I would. I will read that. Caught all day wrong, if you like. Absolutely, we can. We can, we can pope into it a little bit as hole to try to just to try to expand on it as well. Yeah, I was going to so sweet Goddamn it. I close the TAB. Let me about. I might be either the TAB. Do you want me to rate it? Okay, go for it. Yeah, now it's yours. Mine's not working. Okay, we got my tabs anyway. Yeah, really, really got Cha. My Dab's ready to go. Yeah, got forever. All right. So the court is by t Lawrence Right, was a archeologist back in a very, very long time ago. He says. All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their mind, wake up in the day to find find it was vanity. But the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes...

...to make it possible. And so this kind of what I was talking about before, right, like, you know, you've got your motivation and it's easy to get caught up in what other people are doing. And I feel like when he says, you know people who dream, you know in the night, because the fact is this true. Everyone has the dreams, you know, everyone goes all you know how it'd be nice to do this right and be nice to do that, and I'll think a lot of people live their life like that. And you know, it's like I kind of use this as example. You know, when you're a UNI or when you're young, right, you're the infamous promise young person, right, and then eventually, you know, you get a full time job and you know, you start realize you have bills to pay and you realize years go by and this is life and the man that hits you right, that that's a hit that truly we can swimp, see off your feet, yause, and you never want to hit that. You always want to keep that spark alive of going. You know tomorrow is going to be a better day or like it. Keep working towards and even if you do the smallest of the bit and like you know, and that's the thing, if you do the smallest thing, that will make you a point of a present towards your goal. You know, you hopefully, you know most of most people have, you know, a fair while to live. So I think you can make those things come true, or at least work towards them. Even if they don't come true, you know you'll be happy for working towards them, and I think that's the that's the true ideology of like. I think what a lot of people rely on that, you know, motivation of that dog mentality. Shall the dargins right? None of that right, because I think everyone wants the results now, and that's the problem, because it has to be part of your identity. That's what you do. You know every you take a small, tiny step. That's much better than taking six steps today and then for the next month you don't do anything. You know, so I think it's much better works that way. And then even this old saying, and everyone sees it. You know, if you become one percent better each day, at the end of the year you'll be a thirty seven, thirty seven percent better, you know. So you would you rather take? You know, would you rather take that confirmation of thirty pers thirty seven percent at the end of the year? You know. So it's been interesting. There's a real good math equation. I saw that from eating or is he owns to you, even the ors the clothing company, and he was like point one multiplied by zero one, multipled by three hundred and sixty five is like thirty seven. So you've gone thirty seven times where you were from day one by doing one percent every day and throughout tall months you've up to it by that much. So now that's so true. And particularly if you know, if you've got big goals and you've got things that are, you know, difficult to obtain, like you get, there's going to have to be a lot of one percent days because it's a big goal. But then the the but then we also know that the process is the is where we live our lives. So that's what we have to fall in love with. And not the end goal. So there's a little bit of a tricky juggle there too. Is In there. But all men dream, but not equally. And obviously in this context, men is just meant by like person, not just men or woman. It's going to be someone who's going to take offense to them before. So people dream, but not equally. So those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses, so those that dream at night or they dream in a time where they're resting and they're not doing anything, in the dusty recesses. What's the recess? What was recess at AOL, at school? It was a time where you would do nothing. You just get a break, you're just doing nothing. So the dusty recesses of their minds, wake up in the day to find it was vanity. So they were daydreaming at a time where they weren't doing anything. They were at home, they were relaxing, or they might have even been sleeping and thinking about these things. And a new day arises and what was so prevalent at night in this state becomes vanity. Vanity is just like the absence. It's like nothing. So it's like, Oh, you don't really have a connection to it, but the dream is the day, so the dream is the ones that are actioning it. Do An interject there? Yeah, I was just going to quickly servant. Often, when he was talking about vanity, I also got like you know, often you're if you dream and you don't do anything about it, actually hurts you a lot more than actually it actually hurts you. You lose respect for yourself as a person because you know, because often dream is fragments or what could be, and then you know, sort of speak, but you do is not nothing in comparison to what you dream sort of speak. Yeah, most definitely. And if you if your dream was potentially going to give you purpose in life, which is obviously one of the most important things we can ever get, and then we don't take action, that's when we're really you know, we're inflicting a dagger and ourselves because we've been given a a dream or essentially a purpose. And like me, being the person that I am, I believe that God will let us in on his deliberate and...

...created purpose for our life, but not often at times when we realize that we need it. So maybe maybe we really wanted to be one thing at one time, but real purpose was hit in the there. We had to go and do something, and then it was in that purpose, it was in chasing that thing, in that process we realize it was actually going to be somewhere else, and that's sort of the positivity that experience. But yeah, the fact that it does inflict it like it ruins your confidence, and it also would be actually build some resentment as well, because you're sort of you're unhappy with yourself and then that often times gets externally shown. So that's why you might meet people that are really upsett everything in the world and everything's sort of a problem. But yeah, so this is sort of where it opens up and it provides that flip side of and what makes it such a good quote is that the dream is the day. Are Dangerous men to the people that are dreaming, pursuing their purpose or are taking action, the dreamers in the day, during broad day light, or during a time where they're where they're in, you know, in a state of actually getting some things done, for they may act their dreams with open eyes to make it possible. So they're going to create action for their dreams or their purpose in a time, in a place where it's actually going to be tangible and we can actually go and get things done, for example during the middle of day, when you've got two hours alone and you're on your computer. That's when you can actually get reaction. So, yeah, that's a such a great quote and, just like a lot of times with something so like, so deep like that, you've got to read it and then you've got to reread it and then you've got to try to practically apply it to your life. And often times the thing that we're prompted to think of when we read something like that is actually the, you know, the example in our life, and it actually gives it real, like a real strong effect for us and it's not just a generic term, like the great truths in life of the things that we can everyone can apply to their lives, and that quote is like right up there. I really like that one, oh for sure, absolutely. I think there was one thing that I did want to say, and I think it's important to dream, but, you know, and act on those dreams as well, because, even though what I said before kind of contradicting myself, anything in life is possible, right, anything in life is possible, and this is kind of just quickly to touch on this as well. Like you know, if you ever seen, you know, this is what guys I guess you know, before we get kicked off the podcast again, actually, before you go into it. Do you think the world would be a better place if everyone who was on instagram followed David Goggins? The world would be a better place? I don't know about that. But so he's delivery system confuses people. He's core messages of what he's saying is always bang on. It's just he's yelling a hole, is running like a savage, you know. So I don't know if it's a yellow guy, just I just I am starting defined funny. That's all, because it's so repetitive. That's why it's yeah, become funny. Yeah, so that that's the I think. I think his message is very I read his book and I thought it is one of the most wonderful books I've ever read. Can't hurt me, can't hurt me. Yeah, well, the good is on Mayby, so good. Yeah, it's a pretty ruined it. Yeah, would recommend it. So I think it is one of the most brilliant books of all time. And you know, his core believe and he see, he's another person who's driven by well, he was driven by that. God Damn it, I keep forgetting that word that you say that you know that motivation with you know that extrinsic motivation, interjected interjecting motivation. Yeah, yeah, so self improvise pressure. Yeah, selfimposed pressure, but it is damn it's interesting, though. I mean he's a he's one side of the coin that you could be, and he's messages always bang on. I'll tell you another side of the coin that you could be as well, which is complete opposite of David Gogan's. If you ever see the character of Lucifer right, a person who's driven not by is as a character in Sua show. Yeah, the TV show write the character his personality. He's not. He's not Netflix. Yeah, he's also at a partially driven by interjected motivation, but a lot of his a lot of him actually does whatever is motivation is is more self actualization, to find purpose in life, and I think that's more interesting and what I've no matter what he does, even when he's going to struggle, he's kind of having fun. That's I think that's the whole theme of it. I mean, I know it's a show and it's, you know, a fictional but so if we still kind of something you can take away from it. So I think that's interesting as well. I was just going to touch on this is going to say. If you ever realize it, and this is kind of for guys, right, what I was going to say if you often guys, and particularly guys, were single, right, they'll find that, you know, they would want to talk to a beautiful woman and then they would stop themselves from the fear of rejection or whatever, fears, whatever, you know, flip, whatever you know, splot, support, right, whatever they will. The reason they don't do that some and there was a study done. They found that instead of whenever a guy,...

...you know, we're told so a beautiful woman, I didn't wanted to speak to her. Right. I think the experiment when they told them that this person you can speak to and she doesn't want to speak to you, or something like that, or I don't know how the experiment structure. The point was, at the end of the experiments say whenever they wanted to speak to a particular attractive woman, amends instead of their brain initial release of Dopymin actually brain was more known troopern two, more likely to release. Was it called that stress home? One? The opposite of it. God Damn. It was that stress Moon. You mean to open main? No, no, that's the hot is a happy court results, God as all. Yes, sorry, more place. Is The opposite a stress home and my bad. Yeah, the the courtosols right, so they consol levels will go out, and that's what I was talking about. You would lose perspect yourself and a lot of these things. I wanted to do talk about the biology of it because I wanted to say those things aren't just in your head. The actual chemicals being moved around in your body. Things are happening. So there's very real there's real context to them. So their physical things that happen to you. So first thing, once again, you might as well take the action and then regretted later. You know you're less likely to and that was the same thing. Similar study, doing what we're talking about the dog before, even when the dog did not get the reward, that thought, you know, because of the idea of the reward, made them happen. Make got the document release. That means even if you don't get the girl's number, sort to speak, you still feel better. You still get the dopumine release versus having the Corsol levels go up right, and then you feel shit and if you keep going doing downe that partly commit suicide. And that, yeah, that's it. Fall off the defense right. So, yeah, this there's a lot of science behind this and there's that's so you never know what's possible. So I think shoot for the dream, shoot for the stars and, you know, get one percent better each day. Amen, a man. Yeah, it's so fascinating how our brain and how our dren or glands, which produces the court as all like, how how much of affect they have on on everything, like every action and every anymount of similar we're getting in, like theyse near on to constantly firing and our body. And it works the exact same way as what a muscle does when it can racts and eccentrically consentually contracts, like it's the same way. It's just turns out to be that it's happening in our brain. We can't see it, but yeah, it's so fascinating, is so interesting and like it also lets us know that we can, just like we can change the size of our muscles, we can also change the way that we think and Thil and react to certain things. And, like I mentioned the thing about the about like confrontation, like I'm learning now to realize what that is, not to be so so over the bit affected by it, where when I was younger, like I had I had no control over that emotional reaction. And that's the same as like if we're having a meeting with our bosses or we're having a tough conversation with family or friends, like we can always, you know, we can always control the way we react and the power of the brain fire exceeds the power of the physical body that's doing these things. You know, on a subconscious level, it's kind of crazy that the body often acts involuntarily and the mind can be voluntarily controlled like it's it's yeah, it's really beautiful. But Hey, that's been a very in depth and obviously I'll let you say your piece if you've got anything more dadd but that's been like a super indepth podcast. We sort of wanted to go and, you know, take current situations and sort of talk and focus about a psychological approach and just a way of viewing the world that maybe people don't know about. We're definitely going going to have on the website sort of some of the key sort of content and I've got a graph as that we can share up there just to kind of give people a visual representation of what we're talking about. But now, Bro that was very good. It was good podcast. So it was good. Also, the clever podcasts. No Dummies in there today was something most we forget that sometimes might the see in the CDP. Comes first, clever baby. Let's go exactly. Some big words in there. It was approved podcast. My brains pride now, so I said all the big words to that. You know, that's the indicated that we've done a good podcast. Is the brains ready to tap out. So yeah, yeah, maybe it good, but it was good. But becaus now I'm good this. I think I've said everything I had to say. This one thing I want to say. There's an episode that I would like to do about money, in the psychology of money and saving money or the mission. So it's just strictly so maybe we could do that podcast as well one of these days. Section, yeah, added into our our ideas section and we could definitely put that in. Obviously, the last few episodes we've had guests and we're planning to have Charlotte in very soon. Having guests on the podcast is so good, but having our own podcast separately as well. We sort of going to go back and forth there and I think that's going to work really well and we could easily dive deep into that for an hour and it's just such a fancy,...

...fast world's psychology and and and, particularly when you talk about financial decisions and that sort of thing. Like that would be really great. So I'm very much looking forward to that. We've obviously got our generic general information. We've got our website, the clever dummies podcastcom dot AU. Please go on there. We've got so many great resources. We obviously got all our podcast episode Stock Pole, but we'll also have different homework and just kind of a little snippisits that you can take from each episode. And of course we have our social media. We have instagram, we have facebook, we have only fans that we don't have any fans. That's all the clever dummies podcast CDP. So give us a follow, shooters a message if you any feedback as well, and if you're listening to this on apple podcast, in spotify, for example, in any other platform which you definitely know more than I do. Follow us, because those following numbers as they go up, just like user engagement, just like reactions and how long people listen to this podcast, that helps get it out to more people and that would be like an amazing thing. So yeah, very good, for sure, awesome. It's been a great podcast all right. Might Hope you guys have enjoyed that. We certainly have enjoyed making it, as we always do. This has been that episode number twenty eight of the clever dummies podcast, and maybe it can be the psychology of motivation. That could be the great the great name for this podcast. So I've been lucky as always. Thank you so much for joining us. That's been a nick. I love you very much and we catch you sick, that's.

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