The Clever Dummies Podcast
The Clever Dummies Podcast

Episode · 2 months ago

The CDP // Ep28: The Psychology of Motivation

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Hello! In this episode of the Clever Dummies Podcast, we talk a little bit about The Psychology of Motivation among other things like life and its challenges.

thecleverdummiespodcast.com 

A thank you all so much for joining us.This is episode number twenty, eight of the clever dummies podcast. We wererecording this on a very, very lovely friday night, just depending on whoyou're asking but yeah. We really appreciate you joining i'm your host asalways joined by lucky, as always joined by any getting hit of myselfhere. Big dog got a big show plan how you got on to my brother, i'm good, i'mgood, i'm good! It's a beautiful friday evening, as they always say. You knowwe are well. I am still in lock, town and you're in a partial locked on. Soit's a poor man struck down. If you were put me, is locked up in a perfect,perfect time to be executing a podcast, so you know big shop plan. It's goingto be a high energy bank bank show so pretty excited about this yeah me too bo me too, but let's justgo through our generic. You know warm up. I guess, if you will, obviously wecelebrated you know: celebrated avis, firstbirthday and wednesday. That is a tremendous occasion for anyone thatfollows me or charted on social media. We blasted it all over, but she justput so much effort into the day in presence and cake and just made it allso special was like puppy themed and have absolutely loved it. She got likea pre prolifera of gifts. Her favorite thing is like a little quad bike thatshe likes to walk on, and then she had this little block. So we got like abuilding block set and there's like this little red one. She can fit intheir hand and she was holding on to that trying to see the car. He tried totake the thing out of her hand like she, jus get really mad. So you know it'sone lesson that you learn when you have kids is like you can give them all thisstuff, but that they'll just pick some their like and then that's it. You knowwhat i mean to yeah, but it was just such a good dayand everything else has been pretty good sort of getting back into a semi,regular training pattern, just letting the body heal up and yeah getting somedecent bit of feedback from it now starting a sort of push through sort ofthat initial reprogramming phase. If you will just trying to re teach mybody to you know after you sort of deal with a couple of injuries, particularlywhen it comes to weight, lifting like you've got to almost relearn thetechniques, so your ecatepec ting properly and that sort of thing. Soit's been bein good, i'm finally starting and put some numbers and amove a bit of weight now and even though, like you've got to go throughthat initial phase, you don't get the you, don't get the euphoria or therelease of a like midas eraton, in that you normally would when you're liftingreally light. Even you know it's been a long time. It doesn't hit the same, andthen you start, you know putting some reps in super setting and then it'slike. Oh that's! The shit, so that's been really good bro. How aboutyourself, man, yeah, no too bad, not the bad. I know well, first of all, howcrazy is like you know: abbey is a one year old, insane right, sponso, quick! You know it as like. Yesterday she wasborn, but you know my lot. A work was like gee. She must be ready to sit upsoon, like six or so months. I'm like im, mate now she's one next week, he'slike what like yeah totally right. It goes quick goes go, but now i'm well.You know, obviously not training at the moment so because of in this lock donelast couple of days. I've been you know just last cowall last week or so i'vejust been. You know, really long motivation just been kind of grindingit. You know just trying to go to work and come back trying to do things andjust trying to motivate myself to get to do things, but the resistant isalmost uncanny, especially because right now is so cold in sidney at themoment, because that you know that that peko winter right now, that's center point. So yeah we is coldas well, just everything's a little bit harder yeah and then you know, you'vegot the look down, so you fall out of the rhythm and there's no rhythm and,like you know, start falling out of those you know does normally feel less.It's like a up and then you go down cruise down for a bit this. So there'sno rhythm, everything is just grinding it out. You know it's like you knowwhen you climb a hill in your car and then you eventually go down hill andyou cockan relax a bit right now. It's just all up hill. You know year, but apart from that, i given talkingabout that. Apart from that, i'm all good things are good, i'm so glad thati don't have kronogard. So that's fine! Those are the things i'm going on livein fifield yeah. You know. I've been also been kind ofchilling, just playing a few games here and there as well- and you know by all by all means. Probably you knowcan't can't complain too much. I think life is still trading me better than ideserve. So it's a beautiful day to be alive. Yeah, that's a that's a great way tolook at it make. That is the. That is the correct psychological approach. Ifyou will also now very much agree and how's, the family might and has the hasa kids and wife now has a brother and everyone else, but...

...a m not any more. That's all right! We'veall got to go through the right. The few hy breaks in there as well checkthe a the men and then you know you sort it. You know. I don't think you can't name one person who's whoreached greatness with our few hypek in they yeah i mean, if someone's on theirfirst love and they're, starting up a business. You know something'ssomething's, better to happen. You know to be lucky ned that you need that thatheart just stood on trump done bloody, spitting up and then then you can startmoving places. I feel like very true a hundred and ten percent, if you'restarting a business- and you are finding it hard to get motivated, youknow just get your heart heartbroken and your sordid. You know you're onyour way to greatness, might as well start the space ex. You know, becauseyou know you're going to succeed. Imagine all the shitty copped as ayoung feller with that sniper. I of his mate, like that one eye that justdoesn't move now, madish a demon. You know it is what it is. So you know what to say it's very true.At the there was this one thing that i was reading about: yaou richard branson.Now i was talking about, i was talking about ill, must sure i had i had basisin my head and then i'm thinking no branson. I know that's fucking testlike the mill three of a pretty clus to ever then i preety close or they just looking intospace expiration, pretty pretty insane humans. I know that people talk a lotle shit about them about how the the richest people and they talk about thembeing billionaires. To be honest, i mean i never understand that because ithink, first of all, they don't now anyone anything they did whatever theydid on their own, and you know the fact of the matter is you know they play a huge part of theeconomy in the economy and a lot of the people mistake the net worth net worthwith what amount of money they've got in the back. Often is never the caselike when someone says net worth is like. I think i think i just want toquickly clarify this. If you ever get palis have a look at the net income inthere and then the girls that you get into the bank right, so net incomemeans essentially what is in what is under your name doesn't mean they're,not really necessarily fluid acids per se. That's just what's under your name, whether that's fluid or not. Even inmany cases, a net acid can also be owned by the half by the government orsomeone else. Yet just man, public, rite, nieves and everything else.That's exactly right. Like, for example, you know, let's save my net income istwo hundred bucks right and that doesn't necessarily mean i earn twohundred dollars means. You know this probably for my case, like there'sthirty, four thirty, five percent tex right. You go okay. Well, first of allout of that two hundred bucks, you know the government is going to get the partright, thirty to thirty five percent of ay, and you know, and then so they getto keep it. Even though that was under my name, the government still chips itoff me, and then you got things like you know for the things that, eventhough it was under my name still go away like, for example, my hex lane toalso comes out of you know that that next and then you then your then mysuper also comes out of the net, so to speak. So what i'm saying like thepoint? Do you know men like that net in net worth that is, does not define howmuch to earn so you know at most sorry going sorry, ohgood, often many times, that's even as a person is a poor person like right asa poor person, many people even most of the income by the time they get the pay.Let's say if you get paid for nighly by the end of the week, the income wouldbe seven sixty five percent gone and that the amount that you have left isessential. Your essential gross so of speak, ye which i think to bepolitically correct term, is low socioeconomic, not poor, but no. No, no!I goon the clever dams, podcast m yeah! You be left a p it up for me. Maybe i'mnot brook i sorted your eyes but i'll try to help.You say face the bay you just o. That's fine! No! No! But your right and likeif you look at someone like a i mean, if you look at anyone who has a lot ofassets like you know, think about how much we pay on car registration right.I always think of floyd by weather, and this example, because he's actually thefirst combat sports athlete to ever make a billion dollars sol the offcompetition. That's not, including like sponsorships and all his businessventures. That's just solely or fighting the prize. Money has got andthe dude fights every year, even in his forties, because he just spends as muchmoney as he earns. Even more he's got. You know fifty cars they all have to beregistered. You know they have to all be paid for he's going to enter age.People like her so much money that spent through, and even if, even if,like even if someone sells a business and they make a whole lot of money, theamount of people that have to go through to have that business old inthe people that have invested, and then you usually put that somewhere elselike it's, we often like sure they're rich, as fucking like to be in as abeing as for a reason, but i like they...

...can't just they can't just like get upand leave and take their money to go like a lot of those assets are tieddown as well. So it's never quite what people? What once you sort of understand whatit's like? It's like, yeah! It's you know it's hard like. It really islike there's a lot of money if you're making a lot of money, your spending, alot of money, too, that's kind of the thing even with just sort of shift, isin ramble. If you were a lot of business owners during these times,even if they had franchises or they had a lot of money or they had a lot of work, for example, they still have pretty much all thosebills but they're getting way less of the income, because there's less peoplewilling to spend money, there's less opportunities and that sort of thing.So it's it's a yeah. It's a good thing to be reminded of that. You know moneyin that regard. Is it's never what it seems and i think linking back to youroriginal point in regards to way people view. Those guys is like there's alwaysthere's always detractors for successful people, and sometimes it isreally like you know. Sometimes it is understandable, like you know, if yourbill gates in your on body epsteins flight less, like short people, aregoing to come after you now it is what it is and there's a lot of talk aboutthe way amazon treat their people and how they are as as as individual people.But you know you don't know that person. So, if you're judging the way, someoneacts personally like it's different, like you look at at this person as abusiness one and all the successes they had or you look at this person as ahuman being well, like you know, if we all live a public life like how muchhow much of a piece of shit could we look like to so bitter perspective goesa long way. Doesn't it got them? I'd go straight to prison,i'm not even yeah. A lot of us would- and i mean you mightbe able to speck to this more, but there's a reason why a lot of those bigbusinesses look to shift their back end around because, like if you're incalifornia, for example, i think their taxes like forty seven percent, like nowonder people are going overseas and having their money over there and it'scause pretty crazy. How much like taxes, obviously an essential part of athriving society, but it's pretty crazy. How much you you know it's quite depressing whenyou're on a decent living. Seventy eighty grand a year like you're sort ofin that middle, even higher middle socio economic and mat you're stilldown at that bottom fain, live. I'm sorry to tell you oh absolutely, andthat's the thing though, and like you know not now talking about becomingcloser to home right like myself right they. If i do some calculations right,there would be a huge. In fact here i say almost you know that twenty fivetwo you know that thirty percent of the money that i an i'm talk talking abouttaxes, i'm talking, i'm not talking about my income, i'm talking about overall money that i have like you know that i would be incomes incoming wouldgo to the government right like i sing, i'm talking about not just taxes. Let'stalk up because it's easy to talk about taxes right, because tex is anessential part and that's the only thing we really see because that showsup on our you know shows up on our invoices, and ours shows up in ouraccounting system. You know you're paying gesta all that stuff, but thethings that we don't talk about, go under the radar at the the micro onesthat you end up paying like you know. I talk about tolla lot because i tolditself the idea. You know it's pretty incredible. Like you know, i was justlooking at it like everyone sie. You know i roughly in the last financialyears, because i was going through my texas stuff and your last finite years,a i'd roughly paid almost like fourteen fifteen hundred dollars or so dollsright. You go! Oh well! That's not that much! Okay! That's not that much! Let's,plus that you know. Let's add that on top of my you know my tax and i alreadypaid to the government and then i then, the rasho that i paid and when i didn'teven drive the car right and then chuck on for you freaking finds that i gotyou know a couple of admistration phase. A couple of administration feel likethe fun that you get the fun so you get like you know. I mentioned talk aboutthis earlier this year. I got a fine for driving a registered car. The onlydiston was the car was registered in victoria by technicality they did. Theysaid when you intend to move to new southwell's when you intend an it's anintent that actually gets you the fine. So if you decide today that you movingto new south wells, you've card becomes unregistered, so on technicality theyfind me to ve hundred doors. I wrote the find on my table right here right,so you think about all that like well. You know, there's a lot that we canjust go to the government and not to mention all the you know the essentialsthat things that we do like you know petrol and you know the cost of livingitself and like super expensive, and you know subscriptions and all theselitle things had of yeah. It's a mat, the twenty first century, big dog. Thatway you know, so you got all these descriptions like you know one of theone of the this, because i was doing the zemia finances because of text time,and i looked at it. I was like there was so almost so. Twenty eight percentof the expenses were on subscriptions...

...but like of course like for a digitalbusiness. That's that's not that much yeah you're using them that forms inthat yeah yeah, but but twenty eight percent of the expenses, that's at ahuge chunk to just you know so, step ideas, not imagine that with like a more you know, bigger size business, soyou go holy shit like way is you know you have a business that you knowbringing in roughly at nat five million dollars at the end of the year at theend of the financial years. I think they are profiting the prophet netprofit of the business or the gross profit of the business is probably ahundred thirty thou hundred forty thousand that's a going from dikon,because tito business as men, you five millons in a thriving economy as well.You know i mean like that's an anein economy like he can make stuff cuts andhe can make budget cuts in various areas like i'm even dealing with thisat my my job at the moment and like the overhead they have like maintenance isjust like so and they're run by really they run by someone who's like theowners very wealthy and they're run by really intelligent people, so they'reprobably going to be okay, but still there's like a lot of tough decisionsthat need to be made and yeah and that's that's a that's, arelatively big bust comhead to most in this area and probably it's in thehigher percentage across the country as well. So it's yeah, it's it's just another thing.It's another thing that we're going to have to look back on, and maybe we don't quite realize the alongwith mental health and these other things. We don't quite realize the you know the ramifications that thisyou know the part aihen months have had on all of us. So yeah, it's pretty pretty hectic thethe economy of australia. Press i mean most countries will be the same. Iassume it thrives on small businesses, not necessarily those large businesses,because even though they are huge memo businesses that monopolies of their own on their own kind like talking abouttelstra and the you know, the test of the word like you know, telstar on's,practically everything. You know the infrastructure alone, you know, eventhough they make a huge stunt tent, because the government is so reliant onthem. It's like you know it's like essentially having you know the government is so reliant on them.So they're. You know they have some leniency,because the government actually relies on them to stor that the way around youknow the government relies on their infrastructure. I mean imagine if testreturns off the internet at the parliament. Has you know because theycan do that right, so there they've got the power to do whatever the hell theywant, so that i think that is a whole other level part when you talk aboutwhat government thrives on works of, is small businesses and and those high tomeet income earners, because at that point, like i'm getting slap like textlike like a motherfucker, i come in. It's like no worries will take yourmoney and of the week like everyone else is getting support, but for thepast eighteen months i've been like just fucking paying tax like no stopsure they get you get like some text breaks and stuff, but you know doesn'tdoesn't take away from the fact that you know they're giving away money likethey've got it and i like giving to the money like i've got it come to thegovernment. So it's a pretty interesting cycle, but you know that'ssomething that we all learn to live with, but i think this was. We went off track,majorly, yeah, that's what that's fine support! You gotta dig dig the poll init started. This podcasting business is easier said.The dane brothers easy is, i said, the direct that the main point was right.You don't know, you never know the full story and we've just broken down a fewminor aspects and, like i said you know, you know compared to those people werelike broke by the focus, a god, nothing yeah, you know. So it's a whole otherword. So you know it's hard to talk about things that we don't understand. Brig. I was second week of uni for a semester to,and i was on, we have at the moment we're doing online tutorials and i waslike we got broken up into small groups and we use on through some thin cross.We use a program called blackboard and they have like a collaborate platform.So basically your classes in there, the teachers there everything else and theycan split you up into smaller groups, and then you can sort of talk betweenyourself and then i was like. We come back and report to the group and then iwas like. Oh, hey, you know i'll speak like i've got some note to you. I knowwhat to say and then, but i didn't know the content that well and i juststarted rembling and then i lost where my notes was because i sende close thetab, but i'm like so like it's. You know it's and youthink about that. Like you know, that's you think. Like fact, we touch on thissubject a lot, but you know when you hear when you hear glady and all thesejokes is speak every day you just you see the same things there and peoplelike. I was upset at myself because i hate talking like a gambi, but peopleget really defensive in those...

...situations like a lot of the timedisease we yeah exactly right so like in you know, you understand, youunderstand, fuck, you understand a bit of psychology and yeah. This is kind ofwhat we're talking about post, bloody. Sorry, pretty pre podcast, like you, see a little bitof that behavior in yourself and then you start to see it in everyone elseand yeah. It certainly opens up a fair wideword, but just try to keep it all into perspective like this. Even the samething with these inner ol players like, are they making so much money but, liketwelve clubs have recently had to go on they're up in queens there now for thenext four weeks, and they can't see their families and everything else andobviously they're getting paid to play. A professional sport and they've gotpretty good lives, but still like once, you live a life for long enough thatship becomes normal in your mental health still was affected by those sortof things like obviously, for us, because we're not in that world, wewould give our left harm to be paid a mean dollars to play, something we love,but when you're living that life, like people's mental health needs to be, isstill affected by it and a lot of those guys have young families and, like icouldn't imagine, leaving charlotte for four weeks like it aves age, so bit ofa spect yeah. The sort of i don't think so, absolutely and- and i think,there's a lot of different aspect to that as well. Like you know, it'seasier, like you said it's easier, easier, easy to talk about this shitand then just go. You know that's the case or whatever right and the problemcomes in it's when you start looking at it and go you know or i you know, i startcomparing it to yourself, because you got to remember it's different wordsright. That's and that's the that's the key there. It's a different word. I continue just need to check my mikequickly. This is a live. You know if it wasliberated, even what's wearing you us, if i'm using my right, the right mikeokay, you're speaking pretty close to it now, so the volume sounds a bit loudnow, but i've been out o here, you pretty clearly. So let me the me. Letme try this i'll cut this part out later: yeah, okay, it's good all right ting to writethat in night, some yea, twenty one, twenty twenty twenty one. What was thelast year is saying before i'll? Be able to keep continuing yeah, i take asecond and then continue chatting yeah. So, as i was saying, the thing is: it'syou when you don't know the context of the thing and you don't are notfamiliar with it, and you start comparing yourself to those scenariosand aspects you go well what the fuck, like you know. How am i like you know?Well i am the one who's affected or i'm victim, but you know i guess everyonehas dair level of from so it doesn't really. You know it's hard to compareyourself to those. You know some when you're not in someone else's shoes, soi think it's probably a dangerous game where people start playing and likereally- and i heard someone talking about it's like all- people whodifferent billionaires and people who are famous is like defending. You knownot in not defending them per se. I'm just saying that it's, it's probablydoing you more harm than good to anyone. You know it's not gonna. It's not gonnaruin their sleep. I can tell you that you know just what no point you know it's notnothing's going to change it. Business society we live in and another thing isthe key thing we forget. This structure exists because it's because exist issupported by the people. Why do you think japes is the richest person inthe worlds? Because people cannot stop buying shit? Is people's bean? It's ifyou really think about it. Why is jack bezels the richest person in the world,because you know people cannot stop buying shit and yeah you people it'ssuch a consumer, dreman rea! You know i like social networks, like it sure ifmost people had a hit list, suckered would be on there and you know that,though he's done definitely done some shady things. That makes you kind ofwonder how much in control he is is just the face of the brain, but he would be another guy as well. Thatis, has been just thrown in that position and- and i guess maybe my thoughts- i guessor thought i had to that- was i always like. Sometimes, whenever i see andhear people and a lot of people will want to just innately, it's like a human natureto want to look at the problems of other people or judge other people, and,like i blame for a lot of a lot of things. I blame politics recentlyanyway and doing that because it's just created like such a polarizationbetween people- and i mean like we all- have played team sports and everythingelse. So i guess it's in our nature to be competitive against one another, butthat something that's very toxic about politics and as there's not a lot ofpeople at least externally. That seem to be and willing to work together, andit's just a very us versus their mentality and that sort of blees intopeople's every day life. So you just almost every opinion you have will bebased off that sort of popes, because you're so deeply invested the right orthe left or whatever is sort of...

...happening at the time that you're thatbleeds into all other areas and relationships you have with people andit starts to really affect people's behavior and the way people talk and mymommy saw ways tell me, and i hate it as a kid. But what comes out of yourmouth is in your heart. You know what i mean like you're, your mouth, it's justa it's, this, the mouthpiece for for what's in your body, so it's yeah, itkind of says a lot about when that's people's and beingskeptical. All these sort of things are great like and that's healthy, but it'sjust so clear that the amount of people that feel very strongly in that regard,like it concerns me. You know, oh for sure, and i think the one one ofthe things that happens often is we forget that a lot of the narrative thatwe have the words we say, the things that we use and the way when we thinkis actually narrated by often more often than not people who arebenefiting it right of benefiting it off the particular narrative. Right nowi mean to be honest- and i said this before over and over again a lot of thewords that we use even in this podcast that you united and i like to think weare pretty. You know almost a very we kind of you know we constructure thingsa lot better than other people. Not i'm not saying we're smarter, but i thinkit's just we would we have that ocd personality where we, you know, we juststart looking into things more and more right, and i think you and i both havethat a little bit right. So, even though we have that, like kind ofthe conserlation of things, but even like i find myself using the same wordsthat i hear you know from the media or the news or the you know from the youknow the for the from the government like if you ever think about. Why is itthat a particular day you know clad as well? Jiffin would be standingsomewhere to do a press conference another day it should be standingsomewhere else like that's all controlled by like it's. I it's acontrolled environment. To basically give you the kind of behavior like youknow the motive to give you the kind of feelings that you change the idea ofwhat they're trying to convince you know. So it's very like it's a highlevel, cycling, i'm sure, there's a lot of psychologist behind it, like youknow, giving them the what to do, and i same thing with the you know what kindof things that our president says in america. I like to a ileen that that'sreally good point ber, you know so a lot of those things are so already sonarrative and then a lot of its not driven by like super smart speech,writers and all those kind of people. You know those guys are geniuses, hangnew logican programming and, like a kind of things that you can say- andyou know you often- let's say you listen. The simple act of new lingitprogramming is the spit. If you listen to a sentence that i said to you, forexample, i say the you know the word is you know you can do this? The word is,you know the world is for your foot. Taking quite me saying this. Lonecentres gets you hiked up. That's new legousin program because it's jane youremotional state, because you go from one state to another right now. Thatwas just my voice. Now, let's let me if you put me in like a ring right andchange a video to black and white and i'm boxing, and then you said it all ofa sudden. That's more motivating! That's newrins! Broda mic because yourbrain is associating a whole bunch of different feelings with a particularanchor point. So that's you know those kind of things as some advancepsychology. They are right, but with the point is our narrative iscontrolled to begin wid. So it's easy to fall into that loop and just go. Younow go ahead and buy into that. Most definitely like you've studiedmedia, as i have as well like media programming is just such a finely tunedmachine like that. What makes a really good news reader or someone who's onlike a news program, even like sunrise or one of those early mornings, is theydon't just have like the personality and they know how to speak well andthey make you feel like you're one of them, but they know that after this adbreak, they have to speak for four nine or four minutes and fifty nine minutesand then but they're not going to go any longer because they throw studies.They realize that after five minutes people lose attention. So if, at thatfour minute, fifty nine bang, they changed their new story and they play asound with it as well. They don't just shift over and start talking. They playthis sound. So even if you're sort of staring at the tv not listening, yousort of get prompted by this noise, and it's like. Oh here we go again and thenthat's how they use that's that's kind of the briance of television as well,and people kind of go down the rabbit hole and they talk about their psychologically programmingpeople to believe and think a certain way. It's like! Well, you better, butit you better believe they are they're trying to be as affected with theirproduct as possible. That's what keeps people coming back and listening likeit's a ratings game at the end of the day wish sure it's so interesting howdeep all that goes into like it must sure, and that's what i do as amarketer. That's like literally my job and that's what so and you know, i'mnot even that good of a market, i'm there's some genius marketers out therewith like multi psychology got psychology phds with them right. Youthink about like something small i can give to you example right somethingsmall as adding a timer to like an email will improve the commercials byten percent, because people are a people psychologic psycho, logicallyspeaking, are dome to look at time...

...because everyone is dying. Soeveryone's is like. I better get this not because you know it's that he. Soit's a lot of those things. Essentially, these are you know anchor points thatessential feeling that we already have in our mind that you know we justassociate different things with so anchoring is the name of the game. Iguess. Did you have any m any more to sayabout that yeah, because now i think i think we've ripped open that one. Youknow we can almost claw around there and those are. Those are that's kind ofa little bit of our defouled the moment, but because so prevalent and it's ifeel like it's something that needs to be continuously explored and it alsoneeds to be monitored as well like. We need to be constantly questioningeverything and that's a really good concept i live by, so we always has always hit an owl on thehead, so i guess we might as well kind of get to what the main theme of what what the main theme of thispodcast was going to be and like it's, the back and forth, is really good,because you sort of laid a really good platform for psychology there and theway people are able to midilie other people in regards to consumption ofmedia or or products of that sort of thing. But so i don't want to make thislike a lecture where i'm telling you things i like. I want you tointerjected. If you have any thoughts and theories that would be really great,but basically there is a really there's a key concept that psychology is a lotof psychology, particularly psychology en regards to motivation and thegetting people to act or do a certain thing, and that's that's just that'scalled behaviorism, so that was first sort of founded if you were, or atleast pen a paper. I believe this is one of those things that people sincethe beginning of time would have realized that if i do a certain thing,a certain group of people, i can make a behave a certain way, but it wasn'tdocumented until about a hundred years ago. So there's a really famouspsychologist, name, ivan pavlov and he's sort of considered the grandfatherof behaviorism. So in a psychological context- and he had this really famous experiment- and i won't really go intothe experiment now, because it kind of leads us away from the key things thati wanted to talk about. But basically he had a dog and he would he wanted tosee. How could i make this dog act or do a certain way, so he would give thedog some food to dog would wag its tar to be really happy, and then he wouldsort of reward the dog by doing that, eventually, her he was able to wean thedog off the food, and even just by the scent, the dog wasable to start calivan and was waging his tailor was preempting like oh hey,i'm going to get this thing and and pavlov sort of put two and two together.It's a concept called classical conditioning where, basically, ifyou're, prompted by a stimuli, for example, the dog was prompted by a food,he would s start elevating. You know he would get really happy and that sort ofthing and people are the same way like trauma. A lot of studies on trauma arebased off the same sort of context like if you you know, if you were abused asa young person, for example, certain smells and sounds can trigger. You knowyour heart rate to spike and that sort of thing, but kind of where pavlov felloff and where behavioralism evolved into was a few years later and wherethey started to think about cognitive, behaviorism, so pavlov sort of didn'treally take the psychological or mental approach to his behavioral. He thoughtbasically, the way people act is based off soli off their actions in thephysical world like who's in front of me. That's why i'm doing this? Whatneeds to be done? That's why i'm doing this? They started to realize that surethe physical world has a big impact on our actions, but the non physical worlddoes as well like our thoughts. We can start to change the way we view and seeand speak to other people and they really went down, particularly as isaid in the field of motivation. They really started to focus on cognitive,behaviorism and trying to understand why people act and do certain way dothings a certain way and the context i'm going to talk about now is inregards to exercise just because it's a really easy way to link it in in thisseries called self determination theory- and this is based off running basically.So the the concept kind of has six main key elements to it, and this is kind offrom a load to high motivation standpoint. So low motivation meanslike i don't really these tools, i don't really care so much about andhigh is like. Yes, this is something that i want to do and i'm inspired bythe same thing can be taken into consideration with relationships withpeople's businesses like everything else, so a motivated person doesn't seein the example i'm going to use his running, because it's a really easy,really easy exercise that basically anyone can do so. They sort of studiedrunning because it's you don't need a lot of money to study this sort ofthing. You can just get people to run right, so a motive people have nopurpose in running external regulation. Is is the external world that affects youraction, so you might want to please a friend or a spouse, and i i startrunning because hey this person wants...

...me to run with them or they're going tothink more of me there's another form of motivation, andi will be perfectly honest like this. I use this a lot and this is actually oneof in a healthy or unhealthy way that i've used a lot racially. It's calledintreated regulation and that's basically, you would run to avoid guiltand the amount of times that i have gone to the gym recently or friggingfor years, because i'm like i'd, feel guilty. If i didn't do it right, that'sreally a big one, but it's still considered a relatively low form of motivation, because that caneasily even flow like you can eventually just get so guilty where youdon't feel like doing it or you. Could your feelings can override that, so itsort of starts to move in a more positive manner, identified regulation,so you're going into a cent of identity, so you choose to run because it's likeokay, i'm like this is a part of who i am it's like i'm a lifter, i'm a runner.I am this sort of person, so you start to taken on as a part of your identity.That one is a lot more. It's a lot more of a confident form ofmotivation. I guess- and you also integrate that with your lifestyle toso like you'll plan your days around your activity and that sort of thingand then the highest form is just called intrinsic, and this is really ahard one to get to and and that's you run for fun because you actually enjoythe activity and to take a step back into grade. It is also habit buildingand that sort of thing and it speaks about like how to build a habit, andonce you start to identify as a runner, you can actually start to create somepathways in your brain where it helps you build. Those habits like you've,actually, if you're resisting for a really long time, you could, you couldhold back on enough and you stop doing it if you start to go hey. This is justwho i am now. If there's something i do almost immediately, you can start tobuild a habit. That's kind of a really interesting way to think about habit.Building as well as not just looking at as something i do, but actually lookingat is like something. That's a part of you so kind of the low end. Just toreiterate, that is a motivation, so you basically see no purpose in doing it orit's an external thing where hey external things often get us to do alot of stuff like it gets us to act, a lot of way, but its very susceptible tothe word we're living in and then once we get this thing more integrated intoour personalities and we get enjoyment out of it or we make it a part of our like a habitual thing, because we juststart to identify it with it. Then this kind of like it becomes more effective and you cancall it you can kind of use that as a way to help people do certain thingslike. If you had a friend, you know they wanted to start exercising, andit's like all before. We just tell them what to do or give them a program andsay: do this, you kind of got to realize up where they are and it's like.Do they just really hate this thing, and they just don't want to do it? Well,okay, we can do something else, or do they actually want to do it, but theyjust don't know how to they don't have the avocation. Well, actually, that'sreally easy to work with. We can give them the education and they'll startdoing it. So i thought that was a really interesting concept. If youwanted to look more into it, it was called self determination. Theory that came around in the s so aboutfifty or sixty years after they studying behaviorism. It was a guynamed edward decky and that's still the concept they use in health science andthey use in the legal system today, where they figure out. How do we getpeople to act a certain way so yeah there you go. I guess kind ofmy my kind of man take away from that was and like a put a lot of informationthere, but it's it was really linking it towards this, particularly when you put intoconsideration like when we're stimulated by stress- or you know we'rein lock down at the moment and we're hearing about these cases every day orwe're not sure you know we're not sure about where, like our income, if you'rea business owner, for example, like we're, not sure how that's all going togo, there's kind of ways to there's ways to say, motivated by justunderstanding that we can control what we can control and that's by doing ouractions. And then everything else outside of our control isn't reallyeven discussed too much in behaviorism, because there's actually no applicable way tomeasure it, because we ever you know we ever do that because we came control itor we can't so that's kind of helped me a little bit as well as realizing. If ihave stress from things that i can't control then like, i can actually do alot about it by not doing nothing at all, because there's nothin i can dobut yeah they go it so much to unpack there right. So so much so in back there right. So oneof the things i was going to say just quickly right, so i think there's a fewparts to that. Like one of the things i mean now, i can probably touch a littlebit about like consumer psychology as well like one of the just to andgetting people to act, getting people to do, act on certain things and like alot of his and stricti, the experience driver right so often, and then one ofthe things is people and the the kind of links it back to that as well, thatyou know that motivation of easing the pain so to speak because a lot of it alot of it. A lot of the motivation, a...

...long of the goal of these things thatwe do. You know i t e the two goals right. You know- and this is ex this isat a very micro level right, i'm not talking about the macro level where weto start talking about self actualization, starrett michael level.Often gals is to ease the pain or to you know, or maybe this is more of amacro level right. The goals are, is a pain or you know. The second one isavoid the pain from the future right. So you know so those those two thingsthat you'd be doing and then there's another one is to you know, making showyou know and at a cole level that i were you know our jean survives andwhat not right so a lot of that all the time like, for example, we're givingpeople to act on certain things would say: hey you know you know. Well, if you buy this borack,you know you have a high chance of your gen surviving. Second, one is, is yourpain, like you know, by this medicine, and then this? Is it like you'll, bethe solution to all your problems and that's why? If you ever realize in lifethis so many of those gadgets or a particular gadget? When i say i catchyou, i mean any service or a product right when a pretty any gadget, oftenthe one with the most amount of functions. So you know often called themost bank for your back is the most. You know desirable, because that's whyi like, for example, you know people would look into doing excess laexercise like a forty five you're like oh, i will get fit. I will get stronger.I will lose fat all at once, because it's like cardio and weight liftingcombined, but often miss not really the case, because you know you can't findyou know, there's no one feet or solution every ride. So so this a whole bunch of aspects andone of the things interesting when you were talking block- and i thought itwas quite interesting- you know. Oh i hear i send you the picture of that ikind of realized halfway through. I should have actually given this to youas i was reading it, because i would have made probably made it a little biteasier to mow epecially when i started talking about the low to high ones, butanyway we could put that on. We can put that on our eshoo. People can have alook at it and maybe so on our social to you know for for for a huge pot. Inow tell me what you think of this. For for a huge chuck of my life, i wasmotivated by resent, if that makes sense, yeah yeah, and that i still do find interestingand and the funny thing is i've grown as i've grown up right and now i willkind of talk little a little bit about like the way the biology of it right,like you know, a lot of that hatred or not necessarily hatred that thatcontext. That of like the word is against me and i'm against the wordkind of sits on that. You know treble context of the front of lope. If, ifyou will right its very memory driven- and it's very- you know experientialright, so it's a very consciousness and a lot of that motivates. You is becauseyou're a once again trying to you, know trying to arrange your life in a waywhere you mutest lly kind of similar to what you were saying, motivated by awhat did you say, mortia by yeah, so this one, i think, is calledinterjected regulation and the example us was running to avoid guilt. But thisis only a specific example. It's internalized reasons for action, so inintertalent is causing you to act or feel a certain way, for example, thatguilt are not the guilt to the resentment being a lead and it's a selfimposed pressures. Or it's not that's nothing. It's all! It's interjectedfrom inside the ear yeah and the thing is, i realized at a certain point. Ithink i can't exactly tell you what was that point. What was that point, but though irealized at a point, i was like man. This is like heavy shit to carry yourown like all day long. You know yeah yeah, there's no, there's no reason to,because i am who i am like. You know. There's no reason to have to like carry around this burdenof like contanes. To trying to you know reach be a certain way because irealize well hey i'm a person who goes to the gym like i am literally a liftof, like you know, that's who that's what i do like a somthin like you know.I work in business like that's who i am i'm a you know like a it changed from,and that was a funny part like the moment before that i was like, forexample, career wise. I was excelling career because i was like driven bythis uncanny hunger and a like. You know, motivation which was non stopable. So i push my body to its limit. You know working like around the clocktimes right. So that's when i was like you know not always fully function likei would. I wouldn't be a hundred percent effective, but i would do moreif that makes sense right and and not realize a one to the day. I realizedthat i was like hold on a minute. I can do this, like you know. Why do ineed to be so like so hard to push like you know it was almost like. You know it was like kind of like a flick of aswitch for me to go. You know why am i you know running on this treadmill forso to speak or if i can just go for a walk like if that makes sense, yeahyeah,...

...so i ment one of those things. It's notit's not something you could it's not something you can actually fix andsolve by. You know completing a certain amount of work. It's i guess you canargue it's a pretty powerful form of motivation, because i kind of an init's an endless pit, but it can become very toxic and obviously it can alsobleed into you know. Other areas of your life like this is no. I want itbefore. I think what i think, what where do you reckon that came from? Ithink it probably came from earlier o schooling. The funny thing is a lot ofpeople say: oh schooling is a small part and i don't believe that i think schoolinflict a huge part of your life yeah. In fact, l an develops up until we'retwenty five years old, so things that happened. I didn't before that age,like can literally affect people for the rest of the life, and it often doeslike it for sure yeah and i think a lot of the things that i the way i am today and who i am today.My beliefs and my thoughts come from a lot of my experience at school, whetherfor better or wors right, for you know good or bad right. So i'm not sayingnecessarily all bad, because i think i kind of i respect myself as a person.So i don't think it was all bad, but you know i definitely do think certainaspects of it did come from that and that's where it came from as well. Socool school is a very because thing is right, a kid, a child and that's whatthey are right all the way through to the school. Even to the end of thing,you are a child right. Even if you're put i eighteen coming out of school,you essentially still don't really have the full consociation of the word, soyou're coming out as a child, but a child doesn't really care. If you havea court, like you know, if you are, you know, have this incredible thoughtpatterns and you know you're good at these things. They don't care aboutthat. I don't care about your personality, they care about the shinyshoes and you know they care about the attention attention right. You knowthis with the care about like how much attention you can get a lord a thing. Isends bad because a lot of these kids have like hyper abandonment issues andbecause you know from bad parenting and i'm talking about i'm talking aboutlike micro, you know increase like you know, and a very you know at a very subconscious level,but these people carry around the venome issues and then you know anyattention they can get is important, so yeah and then someone else who startslike y? U n w if you're a kind of person who doesn't fit in the grove,and then you know, you're problematic, so there's a whole bunch of things andi think they carry over and then that's when you end up with. You know that level of different thatmotivation, driven which hould say some thing like it's not. This is the badthing because they led me to hym to day, but it is a heavy burden to carry on.So if you can find a way to flick, you keep the same level of spark but flickit to hey like this. Is you know life is not so it's not as resistant. It'slike a resistant that you place on yourself for no reason like you knowit's almost like yeah it's hard to explain, but you can envision it likei've. Just you know it's almost like grinding your teeth of all the timewhen you just don't need to or like you know, pressing you, jo together holdingit or when you can just let it go. You know so to speak. Yea. Definitely youknow it's that that feeling. So it's really interesting, because thathappens right and a lot. I'm sure! That's not just me. A lot of people areprobably driven by that anger and resentment. It's that does end oftenthat resentment is not even focused towards anyone. It's just yeah. So that's interesting as a yeah. It'sjust like it's a repeated. It's repeated thoughts or feelings thatyou've had throughout your life and it becomes, you know, becomes a part ofidentity and that's white. Mental health is so important and often timeslittle issues can grow because we continue to just build on these. Theseways of thinking and everything else like for you personally, like youmigrated from multiple countries. You came to australia at a pretty young agewhere kids were freaking brutal and you you are still learning the language inthe way, particularly australians, just weird the way we speak and you had wereconstantly on the move and trying to figure things out. So you had a lot ofyour key development or years, particularly free puberty. I feel likea puberty's like that key time where, where things just take off andeverything's heighten you, you know what i mean somethin that totally- andi understand that- and i knew that about you, but i loved it about youthat you are a resentful basset, but obviously, as we as we're getting olderand as we're growing like you know, that's not really a part of who you arenow at least i can't see any negative effects of it. Obviously you live withyourself, you, you know you know more, but is that? Does that kind of makesense, oh for sure, and for i think one of the things is later on. I am alot more so much more one of the things that i a e, probably more hyper aware of that,and this is kind of what we're talking about before ye, that hyper of werness.Now that i know, and i was able to conditionis exactly what i, what myprocess was, i'm so hyper away of it. So my little sister, i'm so always soworried about, like you, know her going down that pot because it's a freaking,you know it's a toxic path, so i don't think it makes any bad long termeffects that i can see per se apart...

...from apart from you know, being sotempered at times a very few times. You know certain triggers you know aboutthat. I don't think service at a restaurant. That's it's inter yeah! Exactly so it's! Ithink it's interesting because you know it's interesting because i don't thinki have any side effects, but eventually that you know those habits that i didbuild. My body was built against its actually the brat. The part of thebrain are responsible for this is kind of like you know, it's kind of hidbetween the little serib, co, tex right and it's kind of the middle part. It'scalled basil genga. I think that's as a angliyep. They be ill gangleri. So that's kind of the part like there's, alsolike where your ridicula activation system sits and stuff, so that part iskind of kind of responsible for your identity. Almost as well, becausethat's more subconscious or so often when you start doing things like youknow, and a lot of like habits as well like so those habits are sointrinsically drip. Like you know, wire in you that you just do you know somepeople may do like a click of my hand or whatever right. So those things ithink come from those that basil gang gang li. So what's interesting, is even though thatperiod that i was kind of resented for and driven by this motivation. Those things still became part of myidentity and then later was a general go. Well, i don't want to do thesethings was way was more of a more of a challenge than to keep doing them. Soit's interesting so either way. If you can, you know find that motivation likeyou were speaking about whether it's you know, even if it is the what was that wordthat you said lock edocet. I really like that one about a vice rason, onethat i used, yeah, yeah, introjuced regular, objected right, even if youdon't eternalize reason for action. It's i offen prose pressure right yeah,even if it is that self, it pos pressure. If you do it long enough andyou have a you- know a smart way to get out of it, the you know it can actuallystill do some good. So i definitely it's interesting totalk about that, because right now, it's probably the perfect time to talkabout it, because right now, like i was saying, were the beginning, beginningof the podcast, i'm struggling with a motivation is because a lot of those alot of those a lot of those things that i was just talking about. That isprobably related to my now, my rhythm, which oft comes from the ridiculous. Aridicula activation system, altopasso gangle, gan gli- is that you know my rhythm goes likei'm not going to the team anymore, i'm not the out and about i'm, not meetingpeople. Not talking about this. Like ninety percent of my personalities,what's your personality, yeah, i go to the gym and i talk to people. You knowit's essentially that's what it is and those two things that i can't do thatthat play such a huge part in my reality per se. It makes a huge, tentand- and then you know, there's another aspect of it like i was just sayinglocal. Originally in the first look down, i was able to do a lot more andthat was probably different because it was new and there was that novel defectto it. Yeah my stane. No, it's more so there's a way to any stock and start soyou study, you know you start picking up new personality traits of, like youknow, start getting used to this new stimulus of actually just going. Youknow what fuck, i i'm just a lazy person now because- and i think that'swhere the real problem start starting because i part of your brain and that'ssomewhen that goes to you know your three bill. Cortex. Your part of yourbrain knows that these are you're not doing the things that you want to do. You know because they are so wireinside you, but your brain is also getting used to not doing those thingsby with this. You know looked on over and over again and use just acceptingthis reality, and that's the scary part that we start to accept this reality ofjust continues going into lock down. Whenever you know grand pere topmanfeels like it or you know what the ten you andrews girls, you know locked up.So it's interesting that we're accepting this is the reality and wantas our brains to you know, that's the thing our humans are very adactyla.They all adapt to anything and yeah. Eventually we come up with this reallymotivation in her conflict. To do a lot to do to be or not to be. That is aquestion whether there's no bite, my he clings and errors of ourae fortune direct, quite know what movies thatthat's from the the shakspeare play. Yeah come okay,mad dog, my shadow to as yeah yeah it today yeah anyway. That was a lot for a bit o. Doi guess decore and dis decipher and yeah a now. A hundred percent, like yourounded out what i was kind of saying i...

...in a lot of ways- and he applied itvery practically to yourself and that's what's so interesting about psychology-is understanding its relationship to every aspect of our life and the wayour behaviors are affected by so many different things wherever it comes toand what motivates us so like the external, the internal regulations andthat sort of thing- and it's just very it's very practical. So it's reallygood to have a good understanding and there is analysis by prayses as well.You can start to over and eye and look at all these other things, but you knowin a time like where we are now it's definitely. I feel like it's important.It's important that people looking to these sort of concepts and a lot of alot of the time you can learn. You don't have to have formal educationlike you, can just listen to people who, like jordan, peason, is always a reallygood example, but he's a lot of his focus is often times on sort of social policies. If you, if youwere to listen to someone who has a really good and descending of the brainand like there's a really good series on youtube, there's a doctor in the us,a name is caroline leaf. If you wanted to check it out, there's a youtube. Shedoes with a with a pastor in the us named stephen verdict on it's calledtrigged, and she speaks for about fifty minutes and she's a neuroscientist andlike a really smart person. Her names, caroline leath, she's, written heaps ofbooks and you can kind of get another standing of the way. Our brain, instinctively, reactively andsubconsciously does a lot of the things that we do and may be. The reason whywe are going to these thought patterns like how much of our past has inrelationship to like out er fault settings on certain things and certainpeople like even to this day, like i've, always been unconfortable. If i im in asituation that could potentially be perceived as confrontation, it's noteven going to be convention, but if i can create some sort of a reception,that's going to be confrontational, then my default ening will start tocome out and i'll start laughing and i'll start carrying abo the aho andthen trying to de escalate the situation like it's really strange andinteresting, but like then, you can start to identify it in other peoplewhen, for example like if someone stressed out, you can hear it in theirvoice and that would explain why all the times you know you're hearing,glady speaking she's sort of rambling a bit and you like, she doesn't reallyknow what she's talking about, because no one really knows like this isn't sosuch a unique time and history and that's kind of the beauty and the senseof what we're going through right now, maybe the last thought is like what doyou think it's? The most important thing i think right now is just to stayin contact with as many people as possible. I feel like or at leastquality contact with a circle of people, because the last thing people needright now is the fill like a fell alone. I believe yeah yeah. I think the these probably yeah you're right. I mean i think theselevels to that. I think, for example, at the moment, because i spent like allday with people right, i go to work and these people are on me and i come homeand is my family around me and there's no disconnect for that right, i'mfinding! I really don't want to talk to people on the phone. If that makessense, this might be a work thing or just my particular case scenario. Butyou know a few friends call me and i just couldn't wait to get off the firif that makes sense. It's probably also because there's not much to talk aboutas well like a bat from just cold nineteen. I just don't want to fuck youtalk about it. You know tiler yeah, but but i would i would do all that episodeon it. Yes, but that's what we're able to were able were able to go downrabbit hall, as it is tough there, like. I said it's even tough in this contextto to make you know, make good content fora podcast and, like we've, always said that the reason for this podcast wasultimately to try to help other people but like in this infancy stage. It'sreally just about expressing ourselves- and i mean, like you know, when currentevents is like a pretty big doing. It's actually really good. It's actually areally good outlet to use, and this is sort of like pulling the wall back onthe podcast like who really cares, but, like current events, is really good,because it's like very prevalent, it's also constantly changing. So you've gotthis influx of new things. Well, when the current event is one of two thingsovid and lockdowns, it's like you know, you've got a you got to got to try tofigure it out so yeah. I think, honestly and and one of the things ialways said right right is documentation of our life. I mean noone's going to listen to it like i know i can force my kids to listen to it, sothey would have a choice. Those bastards right i mean to to date. I think we'veroughly and if you still think that that your kids are not going to have achoice, mat you're in for you're, going to be too kind harded to your kids proato lift a use. One of the things like i was justsaying to lockland: is i ruhly at this stage we we've got almost forty hoursof recording of just you know as talking which is incredible like howmany people can say they have forty hours of you know their thoughts at usdifferent times in life. You know a different month and dated person andcat aloge for you for your own...

...listening person like ness is beincredible. I think that's what makes life interesting as well. It's kind oflike journaling as well with a friend, so there's a lot to it. I think i thinkthat this is an outlet and that kind of goes back into what we're talking about.You know. There's so many we can easily carry around the weight of our own. Youknow of our own fields. You will yeah, and you know, talking to a friend doesmake a difference and you're right. Actually, you know, probably the bestthing for anyone to do is not feel alone in this time, because i think theprobably the reason i said that it was kind of you know, coming from an ignorant pointof view, is the fact that i said that is because there's so many peoplearound me. So i it's not the prevalent yeah. It's not prevalent, i think, forsomeone who doesn't have this outlet or doesn't have those people around them.It's could be a very tough time, so it's probably worth actually checkingup on people, even though i don't feel like talking to anyone. I should talkto people not for my sake. You know, for the other people say yeah so when,when, when ring like a little bit of that die straight, sometimes like sweat,that's when we can get most oorakin down like if your business is on thebrink of destruction. That's when you dently tend to dig your heels in, soit's easy, not when you're comfortable, but it's easy when you've got a like aabundance of things for not act in a certain way, but you could easily helpsomeone else out by the way you know if you're feeling, like you're, pretty allset while giving someone else a little nod and hey that's what we're doing onthis podcast sort of vicariously as well. You know, maybe one day if we everstart doing live podcast like i'm a little bit reserved to it, because thenit feels too much like radio, but we could. Obviously you know we could. Obviously, thenpeople that are listening can make their comments about certain things andthat could help their conversation or they can ask questions and that wouldbe really cool. I feel like question entering is likereally my favorite thing to do: weah m, but at on one of the o, there'sa risk that no one does it, and then we just got to pretend like nothing'shappening. You know like wee yeah, that's right. I thanks to tin fromnewcastle radiatin. We got to so basically on radio. You know we wouldadvertise our phone, the phone number and get people to request to songs or atopic, and you know every now and again you say our thanks, john fromcabramatta, his recuso, the song, and there was no john from caramana but heysecret to the business, but you don't want to pull the curtain back too far. No, i don't know at all. You don't wantto give away too much. I just lit hints you e, let people wonder it's a lot ofinteresting. I think i think, before before we get into a little bit of moreof a chat. I these few things i want to do want to say right. I know this inthis podcast. I know there was a kind of actually similar theme, regardlessof where we were right. It's a lot about who you are as a person and ithink in life. Things will get tough and you know people will be better thanyou the every day. They'll be they'll, be a billionaire out. There, they'll be a billionaire out there. Youknow that you will never achieve the level level of life. I think that's allpart of life just like how you know, i think it's all over the place and it'snot necessarily bad or good person, at least what it is. I can't believe isaid that again, but you know it is though it is you know, so i think thebest thing going to assen to have said it yeah. You know the the best thingfor yourself to do is to you know, have your dreams, you know, and you know anddream them and leave them as well. You know, there's a really wonderful courtthat i was kind of sagging towards because i've been playing games and iread this cot and i really want to read this odon podcast. I was trying tofigure out how to fion fit this in. So i think kind of makes sense right. Thisis by a te lawrence. I think he was his archaeologist back in his time. The court goes all men dream, but notequally, those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wakeup in the day to find it was vanity. It was. It was vanity,but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with openeyes to make it possible the real the reason i said this man, because ireally like this quart and he whatever i like a cord i like to share it right,say it again say the quite again i would i would. I will read that courtall day wrong. If you like, absolutely we can we can. We can poke into it alittle bit it's hard to try to just to try to expand enit as well yeahi was going to so sway. I got them. I i close the tap. Let me i might be you the tab. Do i'm in toread it? Okay, go for it! Yeah! That's yours!Mine is not working. Okay! We, my eyberg yeah, get fat bra all right, sothe quote is by te laurence right as a archaeologist back in a very very longtime ago. He says all men dream, but not equally, those who dream by nightin the dusty recesses of their mine, wake up in the day to find find it wasvanity a, but the dreamers of the day...

...are dangerous men, for they may acttheir dreams with open eyes to make it possible, and so this is kind of word i wastalking about before i like you know, you've got your motivation and it'seasy to get caught up in what other people are doing and i feel like whenhe says you know if people who dream you know in the night, because the factis his true, everyone has the dreams. You know everyone goes or you know,it'd be nice to do this right and it'd be nice to do that and i'll think. Alot of people live their life like that, and you know it's like. I kind of usethis as an example. You know when you're a uni or when you're young rightyou're the infamous promised young person right and then eventually youknow you get a full time job and you know you start really. You have billsto pay and you realize years go by and this is life and the man that hits you.It t t that's a hit that truly rigging soups. You off your feet. Yes, and you never want to hit that youalways want to keep that spark alive of going. You know tomorrow is going to bea better day or like i keep working to us, and even if you do the smallest ofthe bit and like you know, and that's the thing, if you do the smallest thing,that will make you a point of a present towards your goal. You know you,hopefully you know most of most people have, you know far a while to live, soi think you can make those things come true or at least work to wash them.Even if they don't come true, you know you'll be happier for working towardthem and i think that's the that's. The true ideology of like, i think what alot of people rely on, that you know: motivation of that dog mentality shallgoggins right. It's none of that right because i think everyone wants theresults now and that's the problem because it has to be part of youridentity. That's what you do you know every you take a small, tiny step,that's much better than taking six steps today and then for the next month.You don't do anything you know, so i think it's much better works that way,and then even this, this old saying- and everyone says that you know if youbecome one percent better each day at the end of the year, you'll be a thirtyseven. Thirty, seven percent better, you know so you would you rather takeyou know. Would you rather take that confirmation of thirty thirty sevenpercent at the end of the year? You know so it's been interesting, there'sa real good, math equation. I saw that from edin as he owns to you even the as theclothing company, and he was like point. One multiplied by a point: seronemultiplied by thrude and sixty five is like thirty seven, so you've gonethirty, seven times where you were from day one by doing it one percent everyday and throughout twelve months, you've upped it by that much so now,that's so true, and particularly if you know if you've got big goals and you'vegot things that are, you know difficult to obtain like you got, there's goingto have to be a lot of one percent days, because it's a big goal, but then thethe. But then we also know that the processis the is where we live our lives. So that's what we have to fall in lovewith or not the end goal. So there's a little bit of a tricky jug le there tooisn't there, but all men dream, but not equally andobviously, in this context, men is just meant by like person, not just me, anor woman this going to be someone who's going totake offence to them. So people dream, but not equally, sothose who dream by night in the dusty recesses so those that dream at nightor they dream in a time where they're resting and they're not doing anythingin the dusty recesses. What's the recess, what was recus at all at school,it was a time e. Where you would would do nothing. You just get a break you'rejust doing nothing, so the dusty recesses of their minds.Wake up in the day to find it was vanity, so they were day dreaming at atime where they weren't doing anything. They were at home, they were relaxingor they might have even been sleeping and think about these things and a newday arises and what was so prevalent at night in this state becomes vanity.Vanity is just like the absence. It's like nothing! So it's like! Oh, youdon't really have a connection to it, but the dream is the day. So the dreamis the ones that are actioning it. Do you want to interject er yeah? I wasjust going to bickley, often when he was talk about vanity. I also got likeyou know. Often you, if you dream- and you don't do anything about it- itactually hurts you a lot more than actually it actually hurts you. Youlose respect for yourself as a person, because you know because often dream is fragments orwhat could be, and then you know so to speak. But you do is not nothing incomparison to what you dream so to speak, yeah most definitely, and if, ifyour dream was potentially going to give youpurpose in life, which is obviously one of the most important things we canever get, and then we don't take action. That's when we're really. You knowwe're inflicting a dagger and ourselves because we've been given a dream, essentially a purpose and like me,being the person that i am. I believe...

...that god will let us in on hisdeliberate and created purpose for our life, but not often at times when werealize that we need it. So maybe maybe we really wanted to be one thing at onetime, but real purpose was hid in the there. We had to go and do somethingand then it was in that purpose. It was in chasing that thing in that process.We realized it was actually going to be somewhere else and that's sort of thepositivity of that experience, but yeah the fact that it does inflict it likeit ruins your confidence and it also it actually build some resentment as well,because you're sort of you're unhappy with yourself and then that often timesgets externally shown. So that's why you might meet people that are reallyupset ed everything in the world and everything's sort of a problem but yeah,so this is sort of where it opens up and it provides that flip side of andwhat makes it such a good quote is that the dream is the day are dangerous mento the people that are dreaming pursuing their purpose or taking action.The dreamers in the day, during broad daylight or during a time where they're,where they're in you know in a state of actually getting some things done, forthey may act their dreams with open eyes to make it possible so they'regoing to create action for their dreams, although their purpose in a time in aplace where it's actually going to be tangible and we can actually go and getthings done. For example, during the middle of the day when you've got twohours alone and you're on your computer, that's when you can actually getreaction, so yeah, that's a such a great quote, and just like a lot of times with something so like so deep like that. You've gotto read it and then you've got to reread it and then you've got to try topractically apply it to your life and oftentimes. The thing that we'reprompted to think of when we read something like that is actually the you know the example in our life, andit actually gives it real like a real strong effect for us, and it's not justa generic term like the great truth. In life or the things that we can,everyone can apply to their lives and that quote is like right up therereally like that, one, oh for sure absolutely. I think there was one thingthat i did want to say and i think it's important to dream, but you know andact on those dreams as well, because, even though what i said before kind ofcontradicting myself, anything in life is possible right. Anything in life ispossible, and this is kind of just quickly to touch on this as ball. Likeyou know, if you ever seen, you know this is for guys. I guess you knowbefore we get kicked off the podcast again. Actually before you go into it,do you think the world would be a pet, a better place if everyone who was oninstagram father, david goggins, the world would be a better place here. I don't know about that, but so he'sdelivery system confuses people he's call messages of what he's saying isalways bang on just his yelling, a hot is running like a savage you know, so idon't know if it's a yellow, i just i just i am starting to find it funny.That's all because it's so repetitive, that's why it's e to become funny yeah.So that's the! I think i think his message is be. I read his book and ithought it was one of the most wonderful books. I've ever read. Ican't hurt me can't help me yet what the good one baby so good, yeah, it's areally remindeth wold remend, i think, is one of the most brilliant books ofall time, and you know his cod believe and he see he's another person who'sdriven by well. He was driven by that catamite, forgetting the word that yousay that you know that motivation with you know that extrinsic motivation,introjuced interjection motives, yeah yeah, so the self in me is pressureyeah self in posptone, but is it damon? It's interesting. I mean he's a he's.One side of the coin that you could be, and his message is always bang on i'll.Tell you another side of the coin that you could be as well, which is completeopposite of david gollans. If you ever see the character of lucifer right, aperson is driven not by is as a character in sation yeah. The tv showride the character. His personality he's not he's not nefiseh he's also apartially driven by interjected motivation, but a lot of his a lot ofhim actually does whatever his motivation is, is more selfactualization to find purpose in life, and i think that's more interesting andwhatever no matter what his lies, you n, when he's going through struggle, he'skind of having fun. That's, i think, that's the whole team of it. I mean. Iknow it's a show and it's you know a fictional, but so is you still kind ofsomething you can take away from it, so that i think that's interesting aswell. I was just going to touch on this. I was going to say if you ever realizeit, and this is kind of for guys right what i was going to say. If you oftenguys and particularly guys, were single right they'll find that you know theywould want to talk to a beautiful woman and then they would stop themselvesfrom the fear of rejection or whatever fears. But i would you know i lawhatever you know split your boat right, whatever they the reason they don't dothe amand. There was a study done. They...

...found that, instead of whenever a guyyou know were told so beautiful woman and didn't want it to speak to herright. I think the experiment when they told him that this person you can speakto and she doesn't want to speak to you or something like that, or i don't knowhow the experiment structure. The point was at the end of the experiment, saywhenever they wanted to speak to a particular attractive woman amendinstead of their brain initial release of dobeen. Actually brain was moreponon topona to more likely to release. Was it called that stress home one andthe opposite of it? God dam it. What's that streton dopeman? No, no, no! That's all or hapgood god as all yeah. Sorry more is theopposite of stress, ol man, my bed, a t e, the cortisol right, so they go sothat was brogard and that's what i was talking about. You would lose therespect yourself and a lot of these things. I wanted to do talk about thebiology of it because i wanted to say those things aren't just in your head,the actual chemicals being moved around your body. Things are happening, sothere's very real, there's real context to them. So the physical things thathappen to you so first thing. Once again, you might as well take theaction and then regret it later. You know you're less likely to, and thiswas the same thing similar study doing were we talking about the dog before,even when the talk did not get the reward that you know because of theidea of the reward made him, he maks got the document release. That means,even if you don't get the girl's number so to speak, you still feel better. Youstill get the dope men at least versus having coursol levels, go up right andthen you feel shit and if you keep going doing down that part, you comeinto a t yeah all of the defender's a lot of size behind this and there'sthat's the so you never know what's possible. So i think shout for thedrink soot for the stars and you know get one percent better. Each amen, amen,yeah, i s so fascinating how our brain and how our grena glens, which producesthe carters all like how how much of effect they have on on everything likeevery action and ever you met any amount of stimulae we're getting inlike these neurons are constantly firing in our body and it works theexact same way as one of muscle does when it contracts and ecent consensually attracts like it'sthe same way. It's just turns out to be that it's happening in our brain and wecan't see it but yeah. It's so fascinating is so interesting so likeit also lets us know that we can just like we can change the size of ourmuscles. We can also change the way that we think and fell and react tocertain things and, like i mentioned the thing about theabout like confrontation, like i'm learning now to realize what that isnot to be so so over the be affected by it. Where, when i was younger, like ihad, i had no control over that emotional reaction and that's the sameas like. If we're having a meeting with our bosses or we're having a toughconversation with family or friends like we can always, you know, we can always control the waywe react in the power of the brain far exceeds thepower of the physical body. That's doing these things on a subconsciouslevel, it's kind of crazy that the body often acts involuntarily and the mindcan be voluntarily controlled. Like it's, it's yeah, it's really beautiful,but hey, that's been a very in depth and obviously i'll, let you say yourpeace if you've got anything more dad, but that's been like a super in depth.Podcast, we sort of wanted to go, and you know, take current situations andsort of talk and focus about a psychological approach and just a wayof viewing. The word that may be people don't know about we're, definitely gogoing to have on the website sort of sub the key sort of content, and i'vegot a graph as well that we can share up there just to kind of give people avisual representation of what we're talking about, but now bro. That wasvery good. It was a good podcast son. It was good also the clever podcast, nodummies in there today with some big cos. We forget that sometimes a the seain the c dp comes first clever baby. Let's go the some big words in this. Ibroadcast my brains fried now, so i said all the big words to that. Youknow. That's indicated that we've done a good podcast. Is the brains ready totap out so yea by god, but it was good, but because now i'm good this, i thinki've said everything i had to say. There is one thing i want to say this:an episode that i would like to do about money and the psychology of moneyand saving money outerman. So i just strictly so maybe we could do thatpodcast as well. One of these days actually yeah added into our our ideasection, and we could definitely put that in obviously the last few episodeswe've had guests and we planned to have charlotte in very soon having guests onthe podcast is so good, but having our own podcast separately as well. We sortof going to go back and forth there and i think that's going to work reallywell and we could easily divee deep...

...into that for an hour and it's justsuch advance, fast worlds, psychology and and and particularly when you talkabout financial decisions and that sort of thing like that would be reallygreat. So i'm very much looking forward to that. We've obviously got to ourgeneric general information. We've got our website. The clever dumis podcastcom do a you, please go on there. We've got so many great resources. We'veobviously got all our podcast episode stock pal, but we also have differenthomework and just kind of little snip is its that you can take from eachepisode and of course we have our social media. We have instagram, wehave facebook, we have only fans, and now we don't have any offence. That'sall the clever, dumis, podcast cd p, so give us a follow, shoot us a message ifyou any feedback as well and if you're listening to this on apple podcast inspotify, for example, in any other platform, which you definitely knowmore than i do follow us, because those follower numbers as they go up justlike us, our engagement just like reactionsand how long people listen to this podcast that helps get it out to morepeople, and that would be like an amazing thing, so yeah very good forsure awesome, it's been a great podcast. All right might hope you guys haveenjoyed that. We certainly have enjoyed making it as we always do. This hasbeen that episode number twenty eight of the cover, dumis podcast, and maybeit can be the psychology of motivation that could be he the great the greatname for this podcast. So i've been lock as always. Thank you so much forjoining us. That's been a neck. I love you very much and i had ouse.

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